Openly accessible

Domestication via the commensal pathway in a fish-invertebrate mutualism

Brooker, R, Casey, JM, Cowan, ZL, Sih, TL, Dixson, DL, Manica, A and Feeney, WE 2020, Domestication via the commensal pathway in a fish-invertebrate mutualism, Nature Communications, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1038/s41467-020-19958-5.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
brooker-domesticationviathe-2020.pdf Published version application/pdf 915.27KB 16

Title Domestication via the commensal pathway in a fish-invertebrate mutualism
Author(s) Brooker, RORCID iD for Brooker, R orcid.org/0000-0001-8739-6914
Casey, JM
Cowan, ZL
Sih, TLORCID iD for Sih, TL orcid.org/0000-0001-8347-6087
Dixson, DL
Manica, A
Feeney, WE
Journal name Nature Communications
Volume number 11
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Nature Research
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2020-12-07
ISSN 2041-1723
Keyword(s) Behavioural ecology
Community ecology
Evolutionary ecology
Marine biology
Summary Domesticator-domesticate relationships are specialized mutualisms where one species provides multigenerational support to another in exchange for a resource or service, and through which both partners gain an advantage over individuals outside the relationship. While this ecological innovation has profoundly reshaped the world’s landscapes and biodiversity, the ecological circumstances that facilitate domestication remain uncertain. Here, we show that longfin damselfish (Stegastes diencaeus) aggressively defend algae farms on which they feed, and this protective refuge selects a domesticator-domesticate relationship with planktonic mysid shrimps (Mysidium integrum). Mysids passively excrete nutrients onto farms, which is associated with enriched algal composition, and damselfish that host mysids exhibit better body condition compared to those without. Our results suggest that the refuge damselfish create as a byproduct of algal tending and the mutual habituation that damselfish and mysids exhibit towards one another were instrumental in subsequent mysid domestication. These results are consistent with domestication via the commensal pathway, by which many common examples of animal domestication are hypothesized to have evolved.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41467-020-19958-5
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146470

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 22 Abstract Views, 16 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Jan 2021, 10:16:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.