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Species, sex and geographic variation in chlamydial prevalence in abundant wild Australian parrots

Stokes, Helena S., Martens, Johanne M., Walder, Ken, Segal, Yonatan, Berg, Mathew L. and Bennett, Andrew T. D. 2020, Species, sex and geographic variation in chlamydial prevalence in abundant wild Australian parrots, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-77500-5.

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Title Species, sex and geographic variation in chlamydial prevalence in abundant wild Australian parrots
Author(s) Stokes, Helena S.
Martens, Johanne M.
Walder, KenORCID iD for Walder, Ken orcid.org/0000-0002-6758-4763
Segal, Yonatan
Berg, Mathew L.ORCID iD for Berg, Mathew L. orcid.org/0000-0002-5774-3089
Bennett, Andrew T. D.ORCID iD for Bennett, Andrew T. D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8512-2805
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 20478
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Nature Research
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2020-11-24
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
CHLAMYDOPHILA-PSITTACI INFECTIONS
BIRDS
EPIDEMIOLOGY
DISEASES
GREAT
IDENTIFICATION
SURVEILLANCE
GENOTYPE
OUTBREAK
ASSAYS
Summary Chlamydia psittaci (order: Chlamydiales) is a globally distributed zoonotic bacterium that can cause potentially fatal disease in birds and humans. Parrots are a major host, yet prevalence and risk factors for infection in wild parrots are largely unknown. Additionally, recent research suggests there is a diverse range of novel Chlamydiales circulating in wildlife. We therefore sampled seven abundant parrot species in south-eastern Australia, taking cloacal swabs and serum from n = 132 wild adults. We determined C. psittaci and Chlamydiales prevalence and seroprevalence, and tested for host species, sex, geographical and seasonal differences, and temporal changes in individual infection status. Across all species, Chlamydiales prevalence was 39.8% (95% CI 31.6, 48.7), C. psittaci prevalence was 9.8% (95% CI 5.7, 16.3) and C. gallinacea prevalence was 0.8% (95% CI 0.1, 4.5). Other Chlamydiales species were not identified to species level. We identified two C. psittaci strains within the 6BC clade, which is highly virulent in humans. Seroprevalence was 37.0% (95% CI 28.5, 46.4). Host species (including crimson rosellas, galahs, sulphur-crested cockatoos and blue-winged parrots) differed in seroprevalence and Chlamydiales prevalence. Galahs had both highest Chlamydiales prevalence (54.8%) and seroprevalence (74.1%). Seroprevalence differed between sites, with a larger difference in males (range 20–63%) than females (29–44%). We reveal a higher chlamydial prevalence than previously reported in many wild parrots, with implications for potential reservoirs, and transmission risks to humans and other avian hosts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-77500-5
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146494

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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