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New insights on the evolution of the sweet taste receptor of primates adapted to harsh environments

Tamrin, NAM, Zainudin, R, Esa, Y, Alias, H, Isa, MNM, Croft, Laurence and Abdullah, MT 2020, New insights on the evolution of the sweet taste receptor of primates adapted to harsh environments, Animals, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.3390/ani10122359.

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Title New insights on the evolution of the sweet taste receptor of primates adapted to harsh environments
Author(s) Tamrin, NAM
Zainudin, R
Esa, Y
Alias, H
Isa, MNM
Croft, LaurenceORCID iD for Croft, Laurence orcid.org/0000-0001-8471-2408
Abdullah, MT
Journal name Animals
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2076-2615
Keyword(s) primate
phylogenetic
sweet taste receptor gene
diet preference
divergence date
late Miocene
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science
Veterinary Sciences
Agriculture
PHYLOGENETIC-RELATIONSHIPS
BRANISELLA-BOLIVIANA
MIDDLE EOCENE
BODY-SIZE
EL-NINO
MIOCENE
PLATYRRHINE
EXPANSION
SEQUENCE
PONDAUNG
Summary Taste perception is an essential function that provides valuable dietary and sensory information, which is crucial for the survival of animals. Studies into the evolution of the sweet taste receptor gene (TAS1R2) are scarce, especially for Bornean endemic primates such as Nasalis larvatus (proboscis monkey), Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean orangutan), and Hylobates muelleri (Muller’s Bornean gibbon). Primates are the perfect taxa to study as they are diverse dietary feeders, comprising specialist folivores, frugivores, gummivores, herbivores, and omnivores. We constructed phylogenetic trees of the TAS1R2 gene for 20 species of anthropoid primates using four different methods (neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian) and also established the time divergence of the phylogeny. The phylogeny successfully separated the primates into their taxonomic groups as well as by their dietary preferences. Of note, the reviewed time of divergence estimation for the primate speciation pattern in this study was more recent than the previously published estimates. It is believed that this difference may be due to environmental changes, such as food scarcity and climate change, during the late Miocene epoch, which forced primates to change their dietary preferences. These findings provide a starting point for further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ani10122359
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0502 Environmental Science and Management
0608 Zoology
0702 Animal Production
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146502

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.