Long term impacts of phytophthora cinnamomi infestation on heathy woodland in the great otway national park in south-eastern Australia

Wilson, BA, Annett, K, Laidlaw, William, Cahill, David, Garkaklis, MJ and Zhuang-Griffin, Lily 2020, Long term impacts of phytophthora cinnamomi infestation on heathy woodland in the great otway national park in south-eastern Australia, Australian Journal of Botany, vol. 68, no. 7-8, pp. 542-556, doi: 10.1071/BT20054.

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Title Long term impacts of phytophthora cinnamomi infestation on heathy woodland in the great otway national park in south-eastern Australia
Author(s) Wilson, BA
Annett, K
Laidlaw, William
Cahill, DavidORCID iD for Cahill, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2556-0528
Garkaklis, MJ
Zhuang-Griffin, Lily
Journal name Australian Journal of Botany
Volume number 68
Issue number 7-8
Start page 542
End page 556
Total pages 16
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 0067-1924
1444-9862
Keyword(s) Austral grass-tree
dieback
disease
fungus
Great Otway National Park
heathlands
keystone species
pathogen
Phytophthora cinnamomi
vegetation floristics
Xanthorrhoea australis
Summary The significant impacts of the introduced plant pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi on native Australian vegetation have been well documented, but there is less knowledge of long-term effects. We assessed long-term (26 years) disease progression and impacts on vegetation floristics and structure at a heathy woodland site in the Great Otway National Park, eastern section. Disease progressed dramatically between 1989 and 2005 and by 2015 only 0.08% of the site was non-diseased. There were significant declines in plant species richness and numbers of susceptible species; and increases in percentage cover of resistant sedges and grasses overall, and in cover of Leptospermum continentale (prickly tea-tree) in post-disease areas. There were significant declines of Xanthorrhoea australis (Austral grass-tree), a keystone species that contributes greatly to vegetation structure and fauna habitat. There is an urgent need to map the distribution of P. cinnamomi affected vegetation and identify floristically important non-diseased vegetation in the national park. It is imperative that quarantine of non-infested areas, phosphite application, track closures and vehicle wash-downs be implemented to reduce disease extension and protect the significant biodiversity of the region including species rich heathlands and nationally listed threatened plant and fauna species and their habitats.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/BT20054
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0602 Ecology
0605 Microbiology
0607 Plant Biology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146504

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