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The effect of acute sleep deprivation on skeletal muscle protein synthesis and the hormonal environment

Lamon, Severine, Morabito, Aimee, Arentson-Lantz, Emily, Knowles, Olivia, Vincent, Grace Elizabeth, Condo, Dominique, Alexander, Sarah Elizabeth, Garnham, Andrew, Paddon-Jones, Douglas and Aisbett, Brad 2021, The effect of acute sleep deprivation on skeletal muscle protein synthesis and the hormonal environment, Physiological Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.14814/phy2.14660.

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Title The effect of acute sleep deprivation on skeletal muscle protein synthesis and the hormonal environment
Author(s) Lamon, SeverineORCID iD for Lamon, Severine orcid.org/0000-0002-3271-6551
Morabito, Aimee
Arentson-Lantz, Emily
Knowles, Olivia
Vincent, Grace Elizabeth
Condo, DominiqueORCID iD for Condo, Dominique orcid.org/0000-0002-8348-7488
Alexander, Sarah ElizabethORCID iD for Alexander, Sarah Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-2612-7769
Garnham, Andrew
Paddon-Jones, Douglas
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Journal name Physiological Reports
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Article ID e14660
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ
Publication date 2021-01-05
ISSN 2051-817X
2051-817X
Keyword(s) hormones
muscle
muscle protein synthesis
sleep deprivation
Summary Chronic sleep loss is a potent catabolic stressor, increasing the risk of metabolic dysfunction and loss of muscle mass and function. To provide mechanistic insight into these clinical outcomes, we sought to determine if acute sleep deprivation blunts skeletal muscle protein synthesis and promotes a catabolic environment. Healthy young adults (N = 13; seven male, six female) were subjected to one night of total sleep deprivation (DEP) and normal sleep (CON) in a randomized cross‐over design. Anabolic and catabolic hormonal profiles were assessed across the following day. Postprandial muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was assessed between 13:00 and 15:00 and gene markers of muscle protein degradation were assessed at 13:00. Acute sleep deprivation reduced muscle protein synthesis by 18% (CON: 0.072 ± 0.015% vs. DEP: 0.059 ± 0.014%·h‐1, p = .040). In addition, sleep deprivation increased plasma cortisol by 21% (p = .030) and decreased plasma testosterone by 24% (p = .029). No difference was found in the markers of protein degradation. A single night of total sleep deprivation is sufficient to induce anabolic resistance and a procatabolic environment. These acute changes may represent mechanistic precursors driving the metabolic dysfunction and body composition changes associated with chronic sleep deprivation.
Language eng
DOI 10.14814/phy2.14660
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0606 Physiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1116 Medical Physiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2021, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146518

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.