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Young Adults With Higher Motives and Expectancies of Regular Cannabis Use Show Poorer Psychosocial Functioning

Amiet, D, Youssef, George, Hagg, LJ, Lorenzetti, V, Parkes, L, Solowij, N and Yücel, M 2020, Young Adults With Higher Motives and Expectancies of Regular Cannabis Use Show Poorer Psychosocial Functioning, Frontiers in Psychiatry, vol. 11, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2020.599365.

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Title Young Adults With Higher Motives and Expectancies of Regular Cannabis Use Show Poorer Psychosocial Functioning
Author(s) Amiet, D
Youssef, GeorgeORCID iD for Youssef, George orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Hagg, LJ
Lorenzetti, V
Parkes, L
Solowij, N
Yücel, M
Journal name Frontiers in Psychiatry
Volume number 11
Article ID 599365
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-12-15
ISSN 1664-0640
Keyword(s) cannabis (marijuana)
regular users
psychosocial functioning
young adult
motives
expectancies
latent class
Summary Background: Young adults regularly using cannabis represent a uniquely vulnerable yet heterogeneous cohort. Few studies have examined user profiles using cannabis use motives and expectations. The association between user profiles and psychosocial functioning among only regular users remains unexplored. This exploration is important to improve public education efforts and design tailor treatment approaches. Methods: Regular cannabis users (at least weekly; n = 329) completed an online survey via Amazon Mechanical Turk. The survey measured levels of cannabis use, other substance use, motives and expectations of cannabis use, symptoms of psychosis, depression, anxiety and stress, and reckless behavior such as getting high before work or driving under the influence of cannabis. Latent class analysis was performed using motives and expectations to identify data driven patterns of regular cannabis use. Classes were then used to investigate mental health and behavioral correlates of differences in motives and expectations. Results: A 2-class solution provided the best fit to the data; Class 1: Low Motives and Expectancies (n = 158) characterized by lower endorsement across all motivation and expectation variables, and Class 2: High Motives and Expectancies (n = 171) characterized by endorsing multiple motivations, and higher positive and negative expectations of cannabis use. Classes differed in a range of cannabis use variables; e.g., greater proportion of peer use in Class 2. The High Motives and Expectancies users reported higher symptoms of psychosis (positive and negative symptoms), depression, anxiety, and stress. A higher proportion met the criteria for a cannabis use disorder compared with Low Motives and Expectancies users. High Motives and Expectancies users reported higher mean problems with nicotine dependence and illicit drug use other than cannabis and were more likely to get high before work and drive under the influence of cannabis. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity among young regular cannabis users in their motivations and expectancies of use and associated psychosocial functioning. Understanding motives and expectancies can help segregate which users are at higher risk of worse functioning. These findings are timely when designing targeted assessment and treatment strategies, particularly as cannabis is further decriminalized and accessibility increases.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2020.599365
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Amiet, Youssef, Hagg, Lorenzetti, Parkes, Solowij and Yücel
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146670

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.