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Women’s barriers to weight loss, perception of future diabetes risk and opinions of diet strategies following gestational diabetes: an online survey

Gray, Kristy L., McKellar, Lois, O'Reilly, Sharleen L., Clifton, Peter M. and Keogh, Jennifer B. 2020, Women’s barriers to weight loss, perception of future diabetes risk and opinions of diet strategies following gestational diabetes: an online survey, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 24, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17249180.

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Title Women’s barriers to weight loss, perception of future diabetes risk and opinions of diet strategies following gestational diabetes: an online survey
Author(s) Gray, Kristy L.
McKellar, Lois
O'Reilly, Sharleen L.ORCID iD for O'Reilly, Sharleen L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3547-6634
Clifton, Peter M.
Keogh, Jennifer B.
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 24
Article ID 9180
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
diabetes risk
gestational diabetes
weight loss barriers
diet strategies
intermittent energy restriction
theoretical domains framework
PREVENTION
OVERWEIGHT
MELLITUS
HISTORY
BENEFITS
Summary Weight loss after gestational diabetes (GDM) reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM); however, weight loss remains challenging in this population. In order to explore perceptions of T2DM risk, barriers to weight loss, and views of diet strategies in women with previous GDM, a cross-sectional online survey of n = 429 women in Australia aged ≥18 years with previous GDM was conducted. Opinions of intermittent energy restriction (IER) were of interest. Seventy-five percent of responders (n = 322) had overweight or obesity, and 34% (n = 144) believed they had a high risk of developing T2DM. Within the Theoretical Domains Framework, barriers to weight loss were prominently related to Environmental Context and Resources, Beliefs about Capabilities, and Behavioural Regulation. Exercising was the most tried method of weight loss over other diet strategies (71%, n = 234) and weight loss support by a dietician was appealing as individual appointments (65%, n = 242) or an online program (54%, n = 200). Most women (73%, n = 284) had heard of IER (the “5:2 diet”), but only 12% (n = 34) had tried it. Open comments (n = 100) revealed mixed views of IER. Women in Australia with previous GDM were found to lack a self-perceived high risk of developing T2DM and expressed barriers to weight loss related to their family environment, beliefs about their capabilities and behavioural regulation. IER is appealing for some women with previous GDM; however, views vary
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17249180
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146885

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.