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How Coca-Cola shaped the International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health: An analysis of email exchanges between 2012 and 2014

Wood, Benjamin, Ruskin, Gary and Sacks, Gary 2020, How Coca-Cola shaped the International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health: An analysis of email exchanges between 2012 and 2014, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 23, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17238996.

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Title How Coca-Cola shaped the International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health: An analysis of email exchanges between 2012 and 2014
Author(s) Wood, BenjaminORCID iD for Wood, Benjamin orcid.org/0000-0002-8072-9066
Ruskin, Gary
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 23
Article ID 8996
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
conference sponsorship
food industry
The Coca-Cola Company
corporate political activity
Summary There is currently limited direct evidence of how sponsorship of scientific conferences fits within the food industry’s strategy to shape public policy and opinion in its favour. This paper provides an analysis of emails between a vice-president of The Coca-Cola Company (Coke) and prominent public health figures in relation to the 2012 and 2014 International Congresses of Physical Activity and Public Health (ICPAPH). Contrary to Coke’s prepared public statements, the findings show that Coke deliberated with its sponsored researchers on topics to present at ICPAPH in an effort to shift blame for the rising incidence of obesity and diet-related diseases away from its products onto physical activity and individual choice. The emails also show how Coke used ICPAPH to promote its front groups and sponsored research networks and foster relationships with public health leaders in order to use their authority to deliver Coke’s message. The study questions whether current protocols about food industry sponsorship of scientific conferences are adequate to safeguard public health interests from corporate influence. A safer approach could be to apply the same provisions that are stipulated in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control on eliminating all tobacco industry sponsorship to the food industry
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17238996
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146982

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.