First genome of Labyrinthula sp., an opportunistic seagrass pathogen, reveals novel insight into marine protist phylogeny, Ecology and CAZyme cell-wall degradation

Tan, Mun Hua, Loke, Stella, Croft, Laurence J., Gleason, Frank H., Lange, Lene, Pilgaard, Bo and Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M. 2021, First genome of Labyrinthula sp., an opportunistic seagrass pathogen, reveals novel insight into marine protist phylogeny, Ecology and CAZyme cell-wall degradation, Microbial Ecology, doi: 10.1007/s00248-020-01647-x.

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Title First genome of Labyrinthula sp., an opportunistic seagrass pathogen, reveals novel insight into marine protist phylogeny, Ecology and CAZyme cell-wall degradation
Author(s) Tan, Mun HuaORCID iD for Tan, Mun Hua orcid.org/0000-0003-3396-8213
Loke, StellaORCID iD for Loke, Stella orcid.org/0000-0002-5767-6146
Croft, Laurence J.ORCID iD for Croft, Laurence J. orcid.org/0000-0001-8471-2408
Gleason, Frank H.
Lange, Lene
Pilgaard, Bo
Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M.ORCID iD for Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M. orcid.org/0000-0002-4977-0757
Journal name Microbial Ecology
Total pages 14
Publisher Springer Science+Business Media
Place of publication Springer New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2021-01-07
ISSN 0095-3628
1432-184X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Microbiology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Evolution
Ion regulation
Mitochondrial genome
Saprobe
Stramenopiles
Virulence
ENZYMES
DISEASES
Summary Labyrinthula spp. are saprobic, marine protists that also act as opportunistic pathogens and are the causative agents of seagrass wasting disease (SWD). Despite the threat of local- and large-scale SWD outbreaks, there are currently gaps in our understanding of the drivers of SWD, particularly surrounding Labyrinthula spp. virulence and ecology. Given these uncertainties, we investigated the Labyrinthula genus from a novel genomic perspective by presenting the first draft genome and predicted proteome of a pathogenic isolate Labyrinthula SR_Ha_C, generated from a hybrid assembly of Nanopore and Illumina sequences. Phylogenetic and cross-phyla comparisons revealed insights into the evolutionary history of Stramenopiles. Genome annotation showed evidence of glideosome-type machinery and an apicoplast protein typically found in protist pathogens and parasites. Proteins involved in Labyrinthula SR_Ha_C’s actin-myosin mode of transport, as well as carbohydrate degradation were also prevalent. Further, CAZyme functional predictions revealed a repertoire of enzymes involved in breakdown of cell-wall and carbohydrate storage compounds common to seagrasses. The relatively low number of CAZymes annotated from the genome of Labyrinthula SR_Ha_C compared to other Labyrinthulea species may reflect the conservative annotation parameters, a specialized substrate affinity and the scarcity of characterized protist enzymes. Inherently, there is high probability for finding both unique and novel enzymes from Labyrinthula spp. This study provides resources for further exploration of Labyrinthula spp. ecology and evolution, and will hopefully be the catalyst for new hypothesis-driven SWD research revealing more details of molecular interactions between the Labyrinthula genus and its host substrate.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00248-020-01647-x
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0503 Soil Sciences
0602 Ecology
0605 Microbiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2021, Springer Science+Business Media
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147221

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