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Digital rights, digital citizenship and digital literacy: what's the difference?

Pangrazio, Luciana and Sefton-Green, Julian 2021, Digital rights, digital citizenship and digital literacy: what's the difference?, Journal of new approaches in educational research, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 15-27, doi: 10.7821/NAER.2021.1.616.

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Title Digital rights, digital citizenship and digital literacy: what's the difference?
Author(s) Pangrazio, LucianaORCID iD for Pangrazio, Luciana orcid.org/0000-0002-7346-1313
Sefton-Green, JulianORCID iD for Sefton-Green, Julian orcid.org/0000-0001-9318-4934
Journal name Journal of new approaches in educational research
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 15
End page 27
Total pages 13
Publisher University of Alicante
Place of publication Alicante, Spain
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2254-7339
2254-7339
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
Internet
digitilization
collective human rights
citizenship
literacy
Summary Using digital media is complicated. Invasions of privacy, increasing dataveillance, digital-by-default commercial and civic transactions and the erosion of the democratic sphere are just some of the complex issues in modern societies. Existential questions associated with digital life challenge the individual to come to terms with who they are, as well as their social interactions and realities. In this article, we identify three contemporary normative responses to these complex issues –digital citizenship, digital rights and digital literacy. These three terms capture epistemological and ontological frames that theorise and enact (both in policy and everyday social interactions) how individuals learn to live in digitally mediated societies. The article explores the effectiveness of each in addressing the philosophical, ethical and practical issues raised by datafication, and the limitations of human agency as an overarching goal within these responses. We examine how each response addresses challenges in policy, everyday social life and political rhetoric, tracing the fluctuating uses of these terms and their address to different stakeholders. The article concludes with a series of conceptual and practical ‘action points’ that might optimise these responses to the benefit of the individual and society.
Language eng
DOI 10.7821/NAER.2021.1.616
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147291

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.