Openly accessible

Community demand for comprehensive primary health care from malaria volunteers in South-East Myanmar: a qualitative study

Oo, Win Han, Hoban, Elizabeth, Gold, Lisa, Than, Kyu Kyu, La, Thazin, Thi, Aung and Fowkes, Freya JI 2021, Community demand for comprehensive primary health care from malaria volunteers in South-East Myanmar: a qualitative study, Malaria journal, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12936-020-03555-4.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Community demand for comprehensive primary health care from malaria volunteers in South-East Myanmar: a qualitative study
Author(s) Oo, Win Han
Hoban, Elizabeth
Gold, LisaORCID iD for Gold, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Than, Kyu Kyu
La, Thazin
Thi, Aung
Fowkes, Freya JI
Journal name Malaria journal
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Article ID 19
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1475-2875
1475-2875
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Infectious Diseases
Parasitology
Tropical Medicine
Volunteer
Community-delivered model
Malaria elimination
Primary health care
Myanmar
Summary Background Malaria volunteers have contributed significantly to malaria control achieving a reduction of annual parasite incidence to pre-elimination levels in several townships across Myanmar. However, the volunteers’ role is changing as Myanmar transitions from a malaria control to elimination programme and towards the goal of universal health coverage. The aim of the study is to explore the perspectives of community leaders, members and malaria volunteers in South-East Myanmar on community-delivered models to inform an optimal design that targets malaria elimination in the context of primary health care in Myanmar. Methods Qualitative methods including focus group discussions (FGDs) with community members and current or ex-malaria volunteers, and participatory workshops with community leaders were conducted. All data collection tools were pilot tested with similar participants. The FGDs were stratified into male and female participants in consideration of diverse gender roles among the ethnic groups of Myanmar. Data saturation was the key cut-off point to cease recruitment of participants. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results Community members were willing to be tested for malaria because they were concerned about the consequences of malaria although they were aware that malaria prevalence is low in their villages. Malaria volunteers were the main service providers for malaria and other infectious diseases in the community. Apart from malaria, the community identified common health problems such as the flu (fever, sneezing and coughing), diarrhoea, skin infections and tuberculosis as priority diseases in this order. Incorporating preventive, and whenever possible curative, services for those diseases into the current malaria volunteer model was recommended. Discussion and conclusion There was a gap between the communities’ expectations of health services and the health services currently being delivered by volunteers in the community that highlights the need for reassessment and reform of the volunteer model in the changing context. An evidence-based, community preferred, pragmatic community-delivered integrated model should be constructed based on the context of malaria elimination and progressing towards universal health coverage in Myanmar.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12936-020-03555-4
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0605 Microbiology
1108 Medical Microbiology
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147473

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 64 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 21 Jan 2021, 16:03:35 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.