Public diplomacy and social impact of Australian student mobility to the Indo-Pacific: host countries’ perspectives on hosting New Colombo Plan students

Tran, Ly Thi and Bui, Huyen 2021, Public diplomacy and social impact of Australian student mobility to the Indo-Pacific: host countries’ perspectives on hosting New Colombo Plan students, Journal of studies in international education, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1177/1028315320984833.

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Title Public diplomacy and social impact of Australian student mobility to the Indo-Pacific: host countries’ perspectives on hosting New Colombo Plan students
Author(s) Tran, Ly ThiORCID iD for Tran, Ly Thi orcid.org/0000-0001-6543-6559
Bui, Huyen
Journal name Journal of studies in international education
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-01-09
ISSN 1028-3153
1552-7808
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
social impact
student mobility
learning abroad
international education
Australia
the Indo-Pacific region
public diplomacy
New Colombo Plan
Vietnam
Japan
China
Indonesia
Malaysia
Summary Learning abroad is a primary dimension of internationalization of higher education, but little is known about the social impact of learning abroad. While a significant body of the literature in international education has examined learning abroad from the student and academic perspectives, how host communities, especially in the Indo-Pacific, perceive the social impact of hosting students from an Anglophone country like Australia is underresearched. This study addresses this critical gap in the literature by exploring the social impact of Australian students’ learning in the Indo-Pacific from the host perspective. This article emerges from an ongoing study on Australian students’ learning in the Indo-Pacific via the New Colombo Plan (NCP), the Australian government’s signature initiative of student mobility and public diplomacy. It focuses on data from 32 interviews with host organizations, including industry firms, small businesses, nongovernmental organizations, and education institutions, in China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The study shows that not only does the Australian government position the NCP as a strategic public diplomacy tool to build lasting relationships with Indo-Pacific countries, but receiving countries also view the NCP as a catalyst that facilitates the execution of their international agenda. The study identifies four main forms of social impact associated with Australian students’ learning abroad in the Indo-Pacific, perceived by the host communities: (a) strengthening bilateral and international ties; (b) fostering student-to-student, university-to-industry, and university-to-university partnerships; (c) strengthening community engagement through service-learning; and (d) enriching host organization’s training capacity, human resources, and awareness of their own values.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1028315320984833
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 130302 Comparative and Cross-Cultural Education
130103 Higher Education
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC Future Fellowship (FT170100101)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147489

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
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