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What factors help young children develop positive perceptions of their motor skills?

Barnett, Lisa, Hnatiuk, Jill, D’Souza, N, Salmon, Jo-Ann and Hesketh, Kylie 2021, What factors help young children develop positive perceptions of their motor skills?, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18020759.

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Title What factors help young children develop positive perceptions of their motor skills?
Author(s) Barnett, LisaORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Hnatiuk, JillORCID iD for Hnatiuk, Jill orcid.org/0000-0002-5754-7176
D’Souza, N
Salmon, Jo-AnnORCID iD for Salmon, Jo-Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hesketh, KylieORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Article ID 759
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
motor competence
physical self-perception
physical activity
Summary A positive perception of motor skills is important for physical activity participation. The aim was to investigate which modifiable factors predict children’s perceived motor skills. Mothers completed questionnaires when their child was 3.5 and 5 years old. At 5 years old, the children’s perceived motor competence (PMC) was assessed. Separate linear regression models (up to 300 children) examined which factors at each time point predicted children’s PMC, adjusted for relevant confounders. Multivariate models were then run with factors associated (p < 0.10) with perception. At 3.5 years, the time spent with same age and older children (both higher tertiles) and parental physical activity facilitation (sum of facilitation in last month, e.g., taking child to park) were initially associated with higher perception. Dance/gymnastics participation were associated with lower perceptions. Other child behaviours, maternal beliefs, play equipment, and swimming lessons were non-significant. In the final prospective model (n = 226), parental physical activity facilitation when child was 3.5 years old was the only factor to predict PMC. No factors were significant for the cross-sectional analyses at 5 years. Perceptions are formed based on past experiences which may explain why factors at 3.5 years rather than current experiences (when children were 5 years old) were associated with childhood perceptions.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18020759
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID FT130100637
NHMRC 1176885
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147515

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.