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Relapse into undernutrition in a nutritional program in HIV care and the impact of food insecurity: A mixed-methods study in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

Tesfay, Fisaha, Ziersch, A, Javanparast, S and Mwanri, L 2021, Relapse into undernutrition in a nutritional program in HIV care and the impact of food insecurity: A mixed-methods study in Tigray Region, Ethiopia, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18020732.

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Title Relapse into undernutrition in a nutritional program in HIV care and the impact of food insecurity: A mixed-methods study in Tigray Region, Ethiopia
Author(s) Tesfay, FisahaORCID iD for Tesfay, Fisaha orcid.org/0000-0003-0399-1711
Ziersch, A
Javanparast, S
Mwanri, L
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Article ID 732
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
food insecurity
relapse
mixed methods
poverty
poor livelihood
Summary The relapse into undernutrition after nutritional recovery among those enrolled in a nutritional program is a common challenge of nutritional programs in HIV care settings, but there is little evidence on the determinants of the relapse. Nutritional programs in HIV care settings in many countries are not well designed to sustain the gains obtained from enrolment in a nutritional program. This study examined relapse into undernutrition and associated factors among people living with HIV in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. The study employed a mixed-methods approach, involving quantitative and qualitative studies. Among those who graduated from the nutritional program, 18% of adults and 7% of children relapsed into undernutrition. The mean time to relapse for adults was 68.5 months (95% CI, 67.0–69.9). Various sociodemographic, clinical, and nutritional characteristics were associated with a relapse into undernutrition. A considerable proportion of adults and children relapsed after nutritional recovery. Food insecurity and poor socioeconomic status were a common experience among those enrolled in the nutritional program. Hence, nutritional programs should design strategies to sustain the nutritional gains of those enrolled in the nutritional programs and address the food insecurity which was reported as one of the contributors to relapse into undernutrition among the program participants.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18020732
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147593

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.