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Classic serotonergic psychedelics for mood and depressive symptoms: a meta-analysis of mood disorder patients and healthy participants

Galvão-Coelho, NL, Marx, Wolfgang, Gonzalez, M, Sinclair, J, de Manincor, M, Perkins, D and Sarris, J 2021, Classic serotonergic psychedelics for mood and depressive symptoms: a meta-analysis of mood disorder patients and healthy participants, Psychopharmacology, vol. 238, no. 2, pp. 341-354, doi: 10.1007/s00213-020-05719-1.

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Title Classic serotonergic psychedelics for mood and depressive symptoms: a meta-analysis of mood disorder patients and healthy participants
Author(s) Galvão-Coelho, NL
Marx, WolfgangORCID iD for Marx, Wolfgang orcid.org/0000-0002-8556-8230
Gonzalez, M
Sinclair, J
de Manincor, M
Perkins, D
Sarris, J
Journal name Psychopharmacology
Volume number 238
Issue number 2
Start page 341
End page 354
Total pages 14
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2021
ISSN 0033-3158
1432-2072
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Neurosciences & Neurology
Depression
Psilocybin
Ayahuasca
LSD
Mescaline
Placebo
TREATMENT-RESISTANT DEPRESSION
LYSERGIC-ACID DIETHYLAMIDE
MYSTICAL-TYPE EXPERIENCES
LIFE-THREATENING CANCER
DOUBLE-BLIND
ASSISTED PSYCHOTHERAPY
RECURRENT DEPRESSION
PSILOCYBIN TREATMENT
Summary Abstract Rationale Major depressive disorder is one of the leading global causes of disability, for which the classic serotonergic psychedelics have recently reemerged as a potential therapeutic treatment option. Objective We present the first meta-analytic review evaluating the clinical effects of classic serotonergic psychedelics vs placebo for mood state and symptoms of depression in both healthy and clinical populations (separately). Results Our search revealed 12 eligible studies (n = 257; 124 healthy participants, and 133 patients with mood disorders), with data from randomized controlled trials involving psilocybin (n = 8), lysergic acid diethylamide ([LSD]; n = 3), and ayahuasca (n = 1). The meta-analyses of acute mood outcomes (3 h to 1 day after treatment) for healthy volunteers and patients revealed improvements with moderate significant effect sizes in favor of psychedelics, as well as for the longer-term (16 to 60 days after treatments) mood state of patients. For patients with mood disorder, significant effect sizes were detected on the acute, medium (2–7 days after treatment), and longer-term outcomes favoring psychedelics on the reduction of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Despite the concerns over unblinding and expectancy, the strength of the effect sizes, fast onset, and enduring therapeutic effects of these psychotherapeutic agents encourage further double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials assessing them for management of negative mood and depressive symptoms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00213-020-05719-1
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147638

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.