Openly accessible

The impact of covid-19 on rural food supply and demand in australia: Utilising group model building to identifyretailer and customer perspectives

Whelan, Jillian, Brown, Andrew, Coller, L, Strugnell, Claudia, Allender, Steven, Alston, Laura, Hayward, Joshua, Brimblecombe, J and Bell, Andrew 2021, The impact of covid-19 on rural food supply and demand in australia: Utilising group model building to identifyretailer and customer perspectives, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3390/nu13020417.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The impact of covid-19 on rural food supply and demand in australia: Utilising group model building to identifyretailer and customer perspectives
Author(s) Whelan, JillianORCID iD for Whelan, Jillian orcid.org/0000-0001-9434-109X
Brown, AndrewORCID iD for Brown, Andrew orcid.org/0000-0002-6385-3225
Coller, L
Strugnell, ClaudiaORCID iD for Strugnell, Claudia orcid.org/0000-0001-5912-9720
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Alston, LauraORCID iD for Alston, Laura orcid.org/0000-0002-4551-8845
Hayward, JoshuaORCID iD for Hayward, Joshua orcid.org/0000-0001-8484-9930
Brimblecombe, J
Bell, AndrewORCID iD for Bell, Andrew orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 2
Article ID 417
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) COVID-19
community-based system dynamics
food security
food supply chain
rural food supply
rural health
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Summary Prior to the 2020 outbreak of COVID-19, 70% of Australians’ food purchases were from supermarkets. Rural communities experience challenges accessing healthy food, which drives health inequalities. This study explores the impact of COVID-19 on food supply and purchasing behaviour in a rural supermarket. Group model building workshops explored food supply experiences during COVID-19 in a rural Australian community with one supermarket. We asked three supermarket retailers “What are the current drivers of food supply into this supermarket environment?” and, separately, 33 customers: “What are the current drivers of purchases in this supermarket environment?” Causal loop diagrams were co-created with participants in real time with themes drawn afterwards from coded transcripts. Retailers’ experience of COVID-19 included ‘empty shelves’ attributed to media and government messaging, product unavailability, and community fear. Customers reported fear of contracting COVID-19, unavailability of food, and government restrictions resulting in cooking more meals at home, as influences on purchasing behaviour. Supermarket management and customers demonstrated adaptability and resilience to normalise demand and combat reduced supply.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13020417
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147838

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 25 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 04 Feb 2021, 14:44:38 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.