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A systematic review of economic evaluations of health-promoting food retail-based interventions

Tran, Huong Ngoc Quynh, McMahon, Emma, Moodie, Marj and Ananthapavan, Jaithri 2021, A systematic review of economic evaluations of health-promoting food retail-based interventions, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18031356.

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Title A systematic review of economic evaluations of health-promoting food retail-based interventions
Author(s) Tran, Huong Ngoc QuynhORCID iD for Tran, Huong Ngoc Quynh orcid.org/0000-0003-4892-8345
McMahon, Emma
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Ananthapavan, JaithriORCID iD for Ananthapavan, Jaithri orcid.org/0000-0002-5957-6931
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 3
Article ID 1356
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) economic evaluation
food retail intervention
healthy diet
obesity prevention
Summary Background: While the number of retail interventions with impacts on diet- and/or health-related outcomes is increasing, the economic evaluation literature is limited. This review investigated (i) the cost-effectiveness of health-promoting food retail interventions and (ii) key assumptions adopted in these evaluations. Methods: A systematic review of published academic studies was undertaken (CRD42020153763). Fourteen databases were searched. Eligible studies were identified, analysed, and reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: Eight studies that evaluated 30 retail interventions were included in the review. Common outcomes reported were cost per healthy food item purchased/served or cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. Four studies undertook cost-utility analyses and half of these studies concluded that retail interventions were cost-effective in improving health outcomes. Most studies did not state any assumptions regarding compensatory behaviour (i.e., purchases/consumption of non-intervention foods or food purchases/consumption from non-intervention settings) and presumed that sales data were indicative of consumption. Conclusion: The cost-effectiveness of retail-based health-promoting interventions is inconclusive. Future health-promoting retail interventions should regularly include an economic evaluation which addresses key assumptions related to compensatory behaviour and the use of sales data as a proxy for consumption
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18031356
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147950

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.