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Local connections and the larval competency strongly influence marine metapopulation persistence

Cecino, Giorgia and Treml, Eric A. 2021, Local connections and the larval competency strongly influence marine metapopulation persistence, Ecological Applications, no. Accepted, unedited articles published online and citable. The final edited and typeset version of record will appear in the future., doi: 10.1002/eap.2302.

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Title Local connections and the larval competency strongly influence marine metapopulation persistence
Author(s) Cecino, Giorgia
Treml, Eric A.ORCID iD for Treml, Eric A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4844-4420
Journal name Ecological Applications
Issue number Accepted, unedited articles published online and citable. The final edited and typeset version of record will appear in the future.
Article ID e2302
Total pages 41
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1051-0761
1939-5582
Keyword(s) Degree centrality
eigenvalue
eigenvector
larval dispersal
network analysis
out-degree
resilience
self-recruitment
Summary The relationship between metapopulation stability and connectivity has long been investigated in ecology, however, most of these studies are focussed on theoretical species and habitat networks, having limited ability to capture the complexity of real‐world metapopulations. Network analysis became more important in modelling connectivity, but it is still uncertain which networks metrics are reliable predictors of persistence. Here we quantify the impact of connectivity and larval life history on marine metapopulation persistence across the complex seascape of southeast Australia. Our work coupled network‐based approaches and eigenanalysis to efficiently estimate metapopulation‐wide persistence and the subpopulation contributions. Larval dispersal models were used to quantify species‐specific metapopulation connectivity for five important fisheries species, each summarised as a migration matrix. Eigenanalysis helped to reveal metapopulation persistence and determine the importance of node‐level network properties. Across metapopulations, the number of local outgoing connections was found to have the largest impact on metapopulation persistence, implying these hub subpopulations may be the most influential in real‐world metapopulations. Results also suggest the length of the pre‐competency period may be the most influential parameter on metapopulation persistence. Finally, we identified two major hotspots of local connectivity in southeast Australia, each contributing strongly to multi‐species persistence. Managers and ecologists would benefit by employing similar approaches in making more efficient and more ecologically informed decisions and focusing more on local connectivity patterns and larval competency characteristics to better understand and protect real‐world metapopulation persistence. Practically this could mean developing more marine protected areas at shorter distances and supporting collaborative research into the early life histories of the species of interest.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/eap.2302
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 05 Environmental Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2021, Ecological Society of America
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148023

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.