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Environment and local substrate availability effects on harem formation in a polygynous bark beetle

Griffin, Melissa J and Symonds, Matthew RE 2021, Environment and local substrate availability effects on harem formation in a polygynous bark beetle, Insects, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/insects12020098.

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Title Environment and local substrate availability effects on harem formation in a polygynous bark beetle
Author(s) Griffin, Melissa J
Symonds, Matthew REORCID iD for Symonds, Matthew RE orcid.org/0000-0002-9785-6045
Journal name Insects
Volume number 12
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-02
ISSN 2075-4450
2075-4450
Keyword(s) harem polygyny
Ips grandicollis
environmental effects
mating behaviour
Summary Many forms of polygyny are observed across different animal groups. In some species, groups of females may remain with a single male for breeding, often referred to as “harem polygyny”. The environment and the amount of habitat available for feeding, mating and oviposition may have an effect on the formation of harems. We aimed to determine how the surrounding environment (a harvested or unharvested pine plantation) and availability of local substrate affect the harems of the bark beetle, Ips grandicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). In a harvested pine plantation with large amounts of available habitat, the population density of these beetles is much higher than in unharvested plantations. We found the number of females per male to be significantly greater in the harvested plantation than the unharvested one. Additionally, the amount of substrate available in the immediate local vicinity (the number of logs in replicate piles) also influences the number of beetles attracted to a log and size of individual harems. We also examined how females were distributing themselves in their galleries around the males’ nuptial chamber, as previous work has demonstrated the potential for competition between neighbouring females and their offspring. Females do not perform clumping, suggesting some avoidance when females make their galleries, but they also do not distribute themselves evenly. Female distribution around the male’s nuptial chamber appears to be random, and not influenced by other females or external conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/insects12020098
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0608 Zoology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148027

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.