Openly accessible

The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) on nutritional outcomes

Harrowfield, J, Isenring, E, Kiss, Nicole, Laing, E, Lipson-Smith, R and Britton, B 2021, The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) on nutritional outcomes, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/nu13020514.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) on nutritional outcomes
Author(s) Harrowfield, J
Isenring, E
Kiss, NicoleORCID iD for Kiss, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0002-6476-9834
Laing, E
Lipson-Smith, R
Britton, B
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) oropharyngeal cancer
OPSCC
head and neck
human papillomavirus
HPV
malnutrition
weight loss
nutrition
PG-SGA
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Summary Background: Patients undergoing (chemo) radiotherapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are at high risk of malnutrition during and after treatment. Malnutrition can lead to poor tolerance to treatment, treatment interruptions, poor quality of life (QOL) and potentially reduced survival rate. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now known as the major cause of OPSCC. However, research regarding its effect on nutritional outcomes is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between HPV status and nutritional outcomes, including malnutrition and weight loss during and after patients’ (chemo) radiotherapy treatment for OPSCC. Methods: This was a longitudinal cohort study comparing the nutritional outcomes of HPV-positive and negative OPSCC patients undergoing (chemo) radiotherapy. The primary outcome was nutritional status as measured using the Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA). Secondary outcomes included loss of weight, depression, QOL and adverse events. Results: Although HPV-positive were less likely to be malnourished according to PG-SGA at the beginning of treatment, we found that the difference between malnutrition rates in response to treatment was not significantly different over the course of radiotherapy and 3 months post treatment. HPV-positive participants had significantly higher odds of experiencing >10% weight loss at three months post-treatment than HPV-negative participants (OR = 49.68, 95% CI (2.7, 912.86) p ≤ 0.01). Conclusions: The nutritional status of HPV positive and negative patients were both negatively affected by treatment and require similarly intense nutritional intervention. In acute recovery, HPV positive patients may require more intense intervention. At 3- months post treatment, both groups still showed nutritional symptoms that require nutritional intervention so ongoing nutritional support is essential.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13020514
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148120

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 10 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 18 Feb 2021, 07:16:54 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.