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Key stakeholder perspectives on the development and real-world implementation of a home-based physical activity program for mothers at risk of postnatal depression: a qualitative study

Teychenne, Megan, Apostolopoulos, M, Ball, Kylie, Olander, EK, Opie, Rachelle, Rosenbaum, S and Laws, Rachel 2021, Key stakeholder perspectives on the development and real-world implementation of a home-based physical activity program for mothers at risk of postnatal depression: a qualitative study, BMC Public Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12889-021-10394-8.

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Title Key stakeholder perspectives on the development and real-world implementation of a home-based physical activity program for mothers at risk of postnatal depression: a qualitative study
Author(s) Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Apostolopoulos, M
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Olander, EK
Opie, RachelleORCID iD for Opie, Rachelle orcid.org/0000-0002-3816-0670
Rosenbaum, S
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Journal name BMC Public Health
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Article ID 361
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-02-16
ISSN 1471-2458
1471-2458
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Physical activity
Postnatal depression
Program
Co-design
Implementation
Interviews
CFIR
Research translation
Summary Abstract Background Physical activity (PA) is a modifiable risk factor for postnatal depression (PND) and programs are needed to enhance PA amongst women at risk of PND. Key stakeholder involvement in informing development and implementation of such programs is vital. However, little research demonstrates key stakeholder insights to inform the design and delivery of PA programs for improving PND. The aim of this study was to explore key stakeholder perspectives on the design and delivery of a home-based PA program for mothers with PND symptoms to inform future real-world implementation and scale-up. Methods A descriptive qualitative study was undertaken whereby semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives from various key stakeholder organisations involved in postnatal PA and/or mental health, public health and policy in Australia (n = 11). Interviews were conducted between September to November 2019 and explored stakeholder perceptions on the design and delivery of a home-based PA program for mothers with PND symptoms. The interview schedule was informed by both the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) and the PRACTical planning for Implementation and Scale-up (PRACTIS) guide. Data were analysed thematically using both deductive and inductive coding. Results The relative priority of PND and PA was high for most organisations involved, although none implemented PA programs supporting women at risk of PND. Most stakeholders perceived the program as appealing due to addressing barriers to postnatal PA, although identified some feasibility issues regarding funding and delivery mechanisms. Suggestions for program adaptations included an equity focus (e.g. providing socioeconomically disadvantaged women with a greater program dose; translating web-app based content into various languages). Planned components of the program were suggested to align (i.e. relative advantage) with existing initiatives (e.g. equipment hire for nurseries scheme) and screening systems for PND (timing of referral). Perceived barriers to scale-up included logistics/cost of equipment, organisational capacity demands and safety risks/liability. Perceived enablers to scale-up included linking the program with ‘adjunct’ programs and services. Conclusions While the program was appealing and most organisations could see a role in endorsing and/or referring to the program, funding and delivery mechanisms still need to be identified.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-021-10394-8
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148153

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.