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Falling living standards during the COVID-19 crisis: Quantitative evidence from nine developing countries

Egger, D, Miguel, E, Warren, SS, Shenoy, A, Collins, E, Karlan, D, Parkerson, D, Mobarak, Ahmed, Fink, G, Udry, C, Walker, M, Haushofer, J, Larreboure, M, Athey, S, Lopez-Pena, P, Benhachmi, S, Humphreys, M, Lowe, L, Meriggi, NF, Wabwire, A, Davis, CA, Pape, UJ, Graff, T, Voors, M, Nekesa, C and Vernot, C 2021, Falling living standards during the COVID-19 crisis: Quantitative evidence from nine developing countries, Science Advances, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.abe0997.

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Title Falling living standards during the COVID-19 crisis: Quantitative evidence from nine developing countries
Author(s) Egger, D
Miguel, E
Warren, SS
Shenoy, A
Collins, E
Karlan, D
Parkerson, D
Mobarak, Ahmed
Fink, G
Udry, C
Walker, M
Haushofer, J
Larreboure, M
Athey, S
Lopez-Pena, P
Benhachmi, S
Humphreys, M
Lowe, L
Meriggi, NF
Wabwire, A
Davis, CA
Pape, UJ
Graff, T
Voors, M
Nekesa, C
Vernot, C
Journal name Science Advances
Volume number 7
Issue number 6
Article ID eabe0997
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2021-02-05
ISSN 2375-2548
2375-2548
Summary Despite numerous journalistic accounts, systematic quantitative evidence on economic conditions during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic remains scarce for most low- and middle-income countries, partly due to limitations of official economic statistics in environments with large informal sectors and subsistence agriculture. We assemble evidence from over 30,000 respondents in 16 original household surveys from nine countries in Africa (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, Sierra Leone), Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Philippines), and Latin America (Colombia). We document declines in employment and income in all settings beginning March 2020. The share of households experiencing an income drop ranges from 8 to 87% (median, 68%). Household coping strategies and government assistance were insufficient to sustain precrisis living standards, resulting in widespread food insecurity and dire economic conditions even 3 months into the crisis. We discuss promising policy responses and speculate about the risk of persistent adverse effects, especially among children and other vulnerable groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.abe0997
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148201

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Open Access Collection
Department of Economics
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
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Created: Wed, 24 Feb 2021, 12:12:13 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.