Openly accessible

Nurse motivation, engagement and well-being before an electronic medical record system implementation: A mixed methods study

Jedwab, Rebecca, Hutchinson, Alison, Manias, Elizabeth, Calvo, RA, Dobroff, N, Glozier, N and Redley, Bernice 2021, Nurse motivation, engagement and well-being before an electronic medical record system implementation: A mixed methods study, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 1-22, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18052726.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Nurse motivation, engagement and well-being before an electronic medical record system implementation: A mixed methods study
Author(s) Jedwab, Rebecca
Hutchinson, AlisonORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Calvo, RA
Dobroff, N
Glozier, N
Redley, BerniceORCID iD for Redley, Bernice orcid.org/0000-0002-2376-3989
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 18
Issue number 5
Article ID 2726
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
nursing
nursing workforce
electronic medical record
motivation
work engagement
well-being
burnout
health communication
Summary Implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR) is a significant workplace event for nurses in hospitals. Understanding nurses’ key concerns can inform EMR implementation and ongoing optimisation strategies to increase the likelihood of nurses remaining in the nursing workforce. This concurrent mixed-methods study included surveys from 540 nurses (response rate 15.5%), and interviews with 63 nurses to examine their perceptions of using a new EMR prior to implementation at a single healthcare organisation. Survey findings revealed 32.2% (n = 174) of nurses reported low well-being scores and 28.7% (n = 155) were experiencing burnout symptoms. In contrast, 40.3% (n = 216) of nurses reported high work satisfaction, 62.3% (n = 334) had high intentions of staying in their role, and 34.3% (n = 185) were engaged in their work. Nearly half (n = 250, 46.3%) reported intrinsic motivation towards EMR use. Thematic analysis of focus group interviews revealed two themes, each with three subthemes: (1) Us and Them, detailed the juxtaposition between nurses’ professional role and anticipated changes imposed on them and their work with the EMR implementation; and (2) Stuck in the middle, revealed nurses’ expectations and anticipations about how the EMR may affect the quality of nurse-patient relationships. In conclusion, anticipation of the EMR implementation emerged as a stressor for nursing staff, with some groups of nurses particularly vulnerable to negative consequences to their well-being.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18052726
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149134

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 5 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 15 Mar 2021, 07:29:50 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.