Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition subjects in Australian secondary schools

Nanayakkara, Gamage Janandani Madhushika, Margerison, Claire and Worsley, Anthony 2021, Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition subjects in Australian secondary schools, Health education, vol. 121, no. 3, pp. 311-321, doi: 10.1108/HE-01-2021-0003.

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Title Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition subjects in Australian secondary schools
Author(s) Nanayakkara, Gamage Janandani Madhushika
Margerison, ClaireORCID iD for Margerison, Claire orcid.org/0000-0002-2722-6128
Worsley, AnthonyORCID iD for Worsley, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Journal name Health education
Volume number 121
Issue number 3
Start page 311
End page 321
Total pages 11
Publisher Emerald Publishing Limited
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 0965-4283
1758-714X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Self-efficacy beliefs
Food and nutrition education
Teachers
Secondary school
Summary Purpose – Teachers play important roles in school food and nutrition education. This study aims to explore Australian teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (i.e. belief in their own capabilities to perform specific teaching tasks) in teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects. Design/methodology/approach – Teachers' overall self-efficacy beliefs in teaching these subjects (overall-SEB) and self-efficacy beliefs in teaching different food and nutrition-related topics (topics-SEB) were explored using a survey among 183 teachers in 2017. Principal components analysis derived three overall-SEB components: “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”, “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” and three topics-SEB components: “Food system”, “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation”. Findings – Overall, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident in the majority of items that loaded on “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” compared to “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”. Moreover, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident about items that loaded on “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation” compared” to “Food system”. The overall-SEB and topics-SEB were higher among more experienced teachers. There were moderate positive correlations between overall-SEB and topics-SEB components. Originality/value – The exploration of broader aspects of self-efficacy beliefs related to teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects makes this study unique. The findings highlight that these teachers had high self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition education, but there are gaps in tailoring the teaching process to meet the diverse needs of students and teaching broader food-related topics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/HE-01-2021-0003
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
1303 Specialist Studies in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149218

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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