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The ‘Eat Well @ IGA’ healthy supermarket randomised controlled trial: process evaluation

Blake, Miranda, Sacks, Gary, Zorbas, Christina, Marshall, Josephine, Orellana, Liliana, Brown, AK, Moodie, Marjory, Ni Mhurchu, C, Ananthapavan, Jaithri, Etilé, F and Cameron, Adrian 2021, The ‘Eat Well @ IGA’ healthy supermarket randomised controlled trial: process evaluation, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12966-021-01104-z.

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Title The ‘Eat Well @ IGA’ healthy supermarket randomised controlled trial: process evaluation
Author(s) Blake, MirandaORCID iD for Blake, Miranda orcid.org/0000-0002-0649-2320
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Zorbas, ChristinaORCID iD for Zorbas, Christina orcid.org/0000-0002-7343-2424
Marshall, JosephineORCID iD for Marshall, Josephine orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-3927
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Brown, AK
Moodie, MarjoryORCID iD for Moodie, Marjory orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Ni Mhurchu, C
Ananthapavan, JaithriORCID iD for Ananthapavan, Jaithri orcid.org/0000-0002-5957-6931
Etilé, F
Cameron, AdrianORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 36
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Supermarket
Intervention
Shelf tag
Signage
Process evaluation
Perceptions
Consumer
Australia
Summary Abstract Background Successful implementation and long-term maintenance of healthy supermarkets initiatives are crucial to achieving potential population health benefits. Understanding barriers and enablers of implementation of real-world trials will enhance wide-scale implementation. This process evaluation of a healthy supermarket intervention sought to describe (i) customer, retailer and stakeholder perspectives on the intervention; (ii) intervention implementation; and (iii) implementation barriers and enablers. Methods Eat Well @ IGA was a 12-month randomised controlled trial conducted in 11 Independent Grocers of Australia (IGA) chain supermarkets in regional Victoria, Australia (5 intervention and 6 wait-listed control stores). Intervention components included trolley and basket signage, local area and in-store promotion, and shelf tags highlighting the healthiest packaged foods. A sequential mixed-methods process evaluation was undertaken. Customer exit surveys investigated demographics, and intervention recall and perceptions. Logistic mixed-models estimated associations between customer responses and demographics, with store as random effect. Supermarket staff surveys investigated staff demographics, interactions with customers, and intervention component feedback. Semi-structured stakeholder interviews with local government, retail and academic partners explored intervention perceptions, and factors which enabled or inhibited implementation, maintenance and scalability. Interviews were inductively coded to identify key themes. Results Of 500 customers surveyed, 33%[95%CI:23,44] recalled the Eat Well @ IGA brand and 97%[95%CI:93,99] agreed that IGA should continue its efforts to encourage healthy eating. The 82 staff surveyed demonstrated very favourable intervention perceptions. Themes from 19 interviews included that business models favour sales of unhealthy foods, and that stakeholder collaboration was crucial to intervention design and implementation. Staff surveys and interviews highlighted the need to minimise staff time for project maintenance and to regularly refresh intervention materials to increase and maintain salience among customers. Conclusions This process evaluation found that interventions to promote healthy diets in supermarkets can be perceived as beneficial by retailers, customers, and government partners provided that barriers including staff time and intervention salience are addressed. Collaborative partnerships in intervention design and implementation, including retailers, governments, and academics, show potential for encouraging long-term sustainability of interventions. Trial registration ISRCTN, ISRCTN37395231 Registered 4 May 2017.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01104-z
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149233

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.