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The facilitators and barriers of adopting amylase‐rich flour to enhance complementary foods in the Kersa district community of Eastern Ethiopia

Irenso, Asnake Ararsa, Letta, S, Chemeda, AS, Asfaw, A, Egata, G, Assefa, N, Campbell, Karen and Laws, Rachel 2021, The facilitators and barriers of adopting amylase‐rich flour to enhance complementary foods in the Kersa district community of Eastern Ethiopia, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/nu13030838.

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Title The facilitators and barriers of adopting amylase‐rich flour to enhance complementary foods in the Kersa district community of Eastern Ethiopia
Author(s) Irenso, Asnake ArarsaORCID iD for Irenso, Asnake Ararsa orcid.org/0000-0002-1071-9823
Letta, S
Chemeda, AS
Asfaw, A
Egata, G
Assefa, N
Campbell, KarenORCID iD for Campbell, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) amylase‐rich flour
germination
complementary food
Health Development Army
Ethiopia
child nutrition
undernutrition
malnutrition
amylase-rich flour
Summary Achieving the optimal transition to a family diet over the first two years of life has remained a challenge in Ethiopia. The use of amylase-rich flour (ARF) can improve complementary foods. However, utilisation requires an effective delivery strategy for upskilling the community to use ARF. The aim of this study was to explore facilitators and barriers of cascading ARF skills to improve complementary foods. The study was conducted in Gale Mirga kebele of Kersa district in Eastern Ethiopia in 2016. The study utilised exploratory qualitative research that used participatory action. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with the Health Development Army (HDA) leaders, religious leaders, and observation of participatory complementary food demonstrations. Cultural acceptability and the presence of HDA structure that supports skill development were identified as key facilitators to ARF use. On the other hand, the potential barriers to expanding ARF skill were lack of sustainability of external skill support for HDA leaders, perceived time constraints, unsuitable demonstration settings, cooking method, and large group size. The indigenous community’s knowledge of germination has not been used to improve complementary foods. The universal use of ARF requires integration into the Health Extension Programme (HEP) with support and supervision for HDA leaders.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13030838
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149285

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.