Multivariate Pattern Analysis (MVPA) Reveals Distinct Neural Profiles of Frontoparietal Networks in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Boys with Persistent Depressive Disorder

Vilgis, V, Yee, D, Silk, Timothy and Vance, A 2021, Multivariate Pattern Analysis (MVPA) Reveals Distinct Neural Profiles of Frontoparietal Networks in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Boys with Persistent Depressive Disorder, bioRxiv (Preprints), pp. 1-45, doi: 10.1101/2021.03.09.434662.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Multivariate Pattern Analysis (MVPA) Reveals Distinct Neural Profiles of Frontoparietal Networks in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Boys with Persistent Depressive Disorder
Author(s) Vilgis, V
Yee, D
Silk, TimothyORCID iD for Silk, Timothy orcid.org/0000-0002-7290-512X
Vance, A
Journal name bioRxiv (Preprints)
Start page 1
End page 45
Total pages 45
Publisher bioRxiv (Preprints)
Publication date 2021-07-16
Summary AbstractWorking memory deficits are common in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression, two common neurodevelopmental disorders with overlapping cognitive profiles but distinct clinical presentation. Multivariate techniques have previously been utilized to understand working memory processes in functional brain networks in healthy adults, but have not yet been applied to investigate how working memory processes within the same networks differ within typical and atypical developing populations. We used multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to identify whether brain networks discriminated between spatial vs. verbal working memory processes in ADHD and Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD). 36 male clinical participants and 19 typically developing (TD) boys participated in a fMRI scan while completing a verbal and a spatial working memory task. Within a priori functional brain networks (frontoparietal, default mode, salience) the TD group demonstrated differential response patterns to verbal and spatial working memory. Both clinical groups show less differentiation than TD, with lower classification accuracies observed in primarily the salience network in the ADHD group and in left frontoparietal and default mode networks in the PDD group. Whereas the TD group’s neural profile indicates network response patterns that are sensitive to task demands, the neural profiles of the ADHD and PDD group suggest less specificity in neural representations of spatial and verbal working memory. We highlight within-group classification as innovative tool for understanding the neural mechanisms of how cognitive processes may deviate in clinical disorders, an important intermediary step towards improving translational psychiatry to inform clinical diagnoses and treatment.
Notes In Press
DOI 10.1101/2021.03.09.434662
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149451

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 12 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 24 Mar 2021, 07:50:52 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.