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Maternal dietary patterns and risk of adverse pregnancy (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus) and birth (preterm birth and low birth weight) outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Kibret, Kelemu Tilahun, Chojenta, Catherine, Gresham, Ellie, Tegegne, Teketo K and Loxton, Deborah 2019, Maternal dietary patterns and risk of adverse pregnancy (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus) and birth (preterm birth and low birth weight) outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Public health nutrition, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 506-520, doi: 10.1017/s1368980018002616.

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Title Maternal dietary patterns and risk of adverse pregnancy (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus) and birth (preterm birth and low birth weight) outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Kibret, Kelemu Tilahun
Chojenta, Catherine
Gresham, Ellie
Tegegne, Teketo KORCID iD for Tegegne, Teketo K orcid.org/0000-0002-9137-3632
Loxton, Deborah
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 22
Issue number 3
Start page 506
End page 520
Total pages 15
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2019-03
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Dietary patterns
Dietary intake
Pregnancy
Pregnant women
Summary Objective Epidemiological studies have indicated that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). However, the results of these studies are varied and inconsistent. The present study aimed to assess the association between dietary patterns and the risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Seven databases were searched for articles. Two reviewers performed the study selection and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to estimate pooled effect sizes of eligible studies. Setting Studies conducted all over the world were incorporated. Subjects The review focused on pregnant women. Results A total of twenty-one studies were identified. Adherence to a healthy dietary pattern (intake of vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains) was significantly associated with lower odds OR; 95 % CI) of pre-eclampsia (0·78;0·70, 0·86; I2 =39·0 %, P =0·178), GDM (0·78; 0·56, 0·99; I2 =68·6 %, P =0·013) andPTB (0·75; 0·57, 0·93; I2 =89·6 %, P =0·0001). Conclusions Our review suggests that dietary patterns with a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fish are associated with a decreased likelihood of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. Further research should be conducted in low-income countries to understand the impact of limited resources on dietary intake and adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/s1368980018002616
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149533

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.