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Hospital pharmacists’ experiences of participating in a partnered pharmacist medication charting credentialing program: a qualitative study

Beks, Hannah, McNamara, Kevin, Manias, Elizabeth, Dalton, A, Tong, E and Dooley, M 2021, Hospital pharmacists’ experiences of participating in a partnered pharmacist medication charting credentialing program: a qualitative study, BMC Health Services Research, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12913-021-06267-w.

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Title Hospital pharmacists’ experiences of participating in a partnered pharmacist medication charting credentialing program: a qualitative study
Author(s) Beks, HannahORCID iD for Beks, Hannah orcid.org/0000-0002-2851-6450
McNamara, KevinORCID iD for McNamara, Kevin orcid.org/0000-0001-6547-9153
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Dalton, A
Tong, E
Dooley, M
Journal name BMC Health Services Research
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Article ID 251
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1472-6963
1472-6963
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Pharmacy
Health services Research
Medication therapy management
Patient care management
Patient safety
Multi-disciplinary
Education
Education, pharmacy
Summary Abstract Background Medication-related errors are one of the most frequently reported incidents in hospitals. With the aim of reducing the medication error rate, a Partnered Pharmacist Medication Charting (PPMC) model was trialled in seven Australian hospitals from 2016 to 2017. Participating pharmacists completed a credentialing program to equip them with skills to participate in the trial as a medication-charting pharmacist. Skills included obtaining a comprehensive medication history to chart pre-admission medications in collaboration with an admitting medical officer. The program involved both theoretical and practical components to assess the competency of pharmacists. Methods A qualitative evaluation of the multi-site PPMC implementation trial was undertaken. Pharmacists and key informants involved in the trial participated in an interview or focus group session to share their experiences and attitudes regarding the PPMC credentialing program. An interview schedule was used to guide sessions. Transcripts were analysed using a pragmatic inductive-deductive thematic approach. Results A total of 125 participants were involved in interviews or focus groups during early and late implementation data collection periods. Three themes pertaining to the PPMC credentialing program were identified: (1) credentialing as an upskilling opportunity, (2) identifying the essential components of credentialing, and (3) implementing and sustaining the PPMC credentialing program. Conclusions The PPMC credentialing program provided pharmacists with an opportunity to expand their scope of practice and consolidate clinical knowledge. Local adaptations to the PPMC credentialing program enabled pharmacists to meet the varying needs and capacities of hospitals, including the policies and procedures of different clinical settings. These findings highlight key issues to consider when implementation a credentialing program for pharmacists in the hospital setting.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-021-06267-w
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0807 Library and Information Studies
1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149556

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.