Social media analytics in nutrition research: A rapid review of current usage in investigation of dietary behaviours

Stirling, E, Willcox, Jane, Ong, KL and Forsyth, A 2021, Social media analytics in nutrition research: A rapid review of current usage in investigation of dietary behaviours, Public Health Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 1193-1209, doi: 10.1017/S1368980020005248.

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Title Social media analytics in nutrition research: A rapid review of current usage in investigation of dietary behaviours
Author(s) Stirling, E
Willcox, JaneORCID iD for Willcox, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-6306-5333
Ong, KL
Forsyth, A
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Volume number 24
Issue number 6
Start page 1193
End page 1209
Total pages 17
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Dietary behaviour
Nutrition
Social media
Social media analytics
Surveillance
Summary Abstract Objective: Social media analytics (SMA) has a track record in business research. The utilisation in nutrition research is unknown, despite social media being populated with real-time eating behaviours. This rapid review aimed to explore the use of SMA in nutrition research with the investigation of dietary behaviours. Design: The review was conducted according to rapid review guidelines by WHO and the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Five databases of peer-reviewed, English language studies were searched using the keywords ‘social media’ in combination with ‘data analytics’ and ‘food’ or ‘nutrition’ and screened for those with general population health using SMA on public domain, social media data between 2014 and 2020. Results: The review identified 34 studies involving SMA in the investigation of dietary behaviours. Nutrition topics included population nutrition health investigations, alcohol consumption, dieting and eating out of the home behaviours. All studies involved content analysis with evidence of surveillance and engagement. Twitter was predominant with data sets in tens of millions. SMA tools were observed in data discovery, collection and preparation, but less so in data analysis. Approximately, a third of the studies involved interdisciplinary collaborations with health representation and only two studies involved nutrition disciplines. Less than a quarter of studies obtained formal human ethics approval. Conclusions: SMA in nutrition research with the investigation of dietary behaviours is emerging, nevertheless, if consideration is taken with technological capabilities and ethical integrity, the future shows promise at a broad population census level and as a scoping tool or complementary, triangulation instrument.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980020005248
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149698

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
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