Bonding Social Capital, Afghan Refugees, and Early Access to Employment

Vergani, Matteo, Yilmaz, Ihsan, Barton, Gregory, Barry, James, Bashirov, Galib and Barton, SM 2021, Bonding Social Capital, Afghan Refugees, and Early Access to Employment, International Migration Review, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1177/01979183211000282.

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Title Bonding Social Capital, Afghan Refugees, and Early Access to Employment
Author(s) Vergani, MatteoORCID iD for Vergani, Matteo orcid.org/0000-0003-0546-4771
Yilmaz, IhsanORCID iD for Yilmaz, Ihsan orcid.org/0000-0001-8409-3045
Barton, GregoryORCID iD for Barton, Gregory orcid.org/0000-0002-2134-0704
Barry, JamesORCID iD for Barry, James orcid.org/0000-0002-8965-5665
Bashirov, GalibORCID iD for Bashirov, Galib orcid.org/0000-0002-4093-2916
Barton, SMORCID iD for Barton, SM orcid.org/0000-0001-6504-4686
Journal name International Migration Review
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-03-23
ISSN 0197-9183
1747-7379
Keyword(s) social capital
bridging
bonding
Summary This IMR Research Note examines the impact of the level of bonding social capital on access to employment among newly arrived Afghan refugees in Victoria (Australia). Based on a mixed-methods analysis of biographical interviews with 80 Afghan refugees, it examines their use of social capital, year by year, during the first three years after their arrival. Our analysis shows that higher levels of bonding social capital are associated with greater success in finding employment during the first and second year of settlement. In the third year, however, bonding social capital for Afghan refugees in Victoria is no longer a significant predictor of employment. This Research Note helps clarify inconsistent findings in the literature on the effects of social capital on obtaining employment by suggesting that bonding social capital’s impact on refugee employment success changes significantly across the first three years after arrival. This finding has important implications for migration policy and the prioritization of resources toward services for newly arrived refugees.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/01979183211000282
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 14 Economics
16 Studies in Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149710

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