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Adult Gambling Problems and Histories of Mental Health and Substance Use: Findings from a Prospective Multi-Wave Australian Cohort Study

Merkouris, Stephanie, Greenwood, Christopher, Youssef, George, Letcher, Primrose, Vassallo, Suzanne, Dowling, Nicole and Olsson, Craig 2021, Adult Gambling Problems and Histories of Mental Health and Substance Use: Findings from a Prospective Multi-Wave Australian Cohort Study, Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 10, no. 7, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/jcm10071406.

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Title Adult Gambling Problems and Histories of Mental Health and Substance Use: Findings from a Prospective Multi-Wave Australian Cohort Study
Author(s) Merkouris, StephanieORCID iD for Merkouris, Stephanie orcid.org/0000-0001-9037-6121
Greenwood, ChristopherORCID iD for Greenwood, Christopher orcid.org/0000-0002-9211-6312
Youssef, GeorgeORCID iD for Youssef, George orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Letcher, Primrose
Vassallo, Suzanne
Dowling, NicoleORCID iD for Dowling, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Olsson, CraigORCID iD for Olsson, Craig orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Journal name Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume number 10
Issue number 7
Article ID 1406
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Swtizerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2077-0383
Keyword(s) problem gambling
gambling
persistent
mental health
substance use
longitudinal
anxiety
depression
alcohol
tobacco
cannabis
Summary Little is known about the cumulative effect of adolescent and young adult mental health difficulties and substance use problems on gambling behaviour in adulthood. We use data from one of Australia’s longest running studies of social and emotional development to examine the extent to which: (1) mental health symptoms (depressive and anxiety symptoms) and substance use (weekly binge drinking, tobacco, and cannabis use) from adolescence (13–18 years) into young adulthood (19–28 years) predict gambling problems in adulthood (31–32 years); and (2) risk relationships differ by sex. Analyses were based on responses from 1365 adolescent and young adult participants, spanning seven waves of data collection (1998–2014). Persistent adolescent to young adult binge drinking, tobacco use and cannabis use predicted gambling at age 31–32 years (OR = 2.30–3.42). Binge drinking and tobacco use in young adulthood also predicted gambling at age 31–32 years (OR = 2.04–2.54). Prior mental health symptoms were not associated with gambling and no risk relationships differed by sex. Findings suggest that gambling problems in adulthood may be related to the earlier development of other addictive behaviours, and that interventions targeting substance use from adolescence to young adulthood may confer additional gains in preventing later gambling behaviours.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm10071406
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149738

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.