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Educational and employment outcomes among young Australians with a history of depressive symptoms: a prospective cohort study

Witt, Katrina, Milner, Allison, Evans-Whipp, Tracy, Toumbourou, John W, Patton, George and LaMontagne, Anthony 2021, Educational and employment outcomes among young Australians with a history of depressive symptoms: a prospective cohort study, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 7, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18073376.

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Title Educational and employment outcomes among young Australians with a history of depressive symptoms: a prospective cohort study
Author(s) Witt, Katrina
Milner, Allison
Evans-Whipp, Tracy
Toumbourou, John WORCID iD for Toumbourou, John W orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Patton, George
LaMontagne, AnthonyORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 7
Article ID 3376
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-04-01
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) depression
education
employment
psychosocial job quality
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Science & Technology
Summary The aim of this study was to investigate whether depressive symptoms reported during adolescence are associated with subsequent educational and employment outcomes, including whether experiences of depressive symptoms in adolescence are associated with higher exposures to adverse psychosocial job stressors among those who were employed in emerging adulthood. We used data from the Victorian arm of the International Youth Development Study (IYDS). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to model the association of depressive symptoms reported in 2002 (wave one) and/or 2003 (wave two) and self-reported completion of compulsory secondary schooling, employment status, and exposure to a number of psychosocial job stressors roughly a decade later (i.e., at wave three in 2014). In fully adjusted models, reporting high depressive symptoms at waves one or two (odds ratio (OR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55 to 0.92), as well as at both waves (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.75) were associated with a reduced likelihood of completing secondary schooling by wave three. High depressive symptoms reported at multiple waves were also associated with a reduced likelihood of employment (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.66). Amongst those employed at wave three (n = 2091; 72.5%), adolescent depressive symptoms were associated only with workplace incivility. Psychosocial job stressor exposures should be considered in the design and selection of jobs for young workers with a history of depressive symptoms in order to increase employment participation and sustainability for young people experiencing symptoms of depression.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18073376
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149752

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.