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Effects of a short-term “fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration” diet on metabolic responses and exercise performance in well-trained runners

Che, K, Qiu, J, Yi, L, Zou, M, Li, Z, Carr, Amelia, Snipe, Rhiannon MJ and Benardot, D 2021, Effects of a short-term “fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration” diet on metabolic responses and exercise performance in well-trained runners, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/nu13031033.

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Title Effects of a short-term “fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration” diet on metabolic responses and exercise performance in well-trained runners
Author(s) Che, K
Qiu, J
Yi, L
Zou, M
Li, Z
Carr, AmeliaORCID iD for Carr, Amelia orcid.org/0000-0003-3855-2540
Snipe, Rhiannon MJORCID iD for Snipe, Rhiannon MJ orcid.org/0000-0002-3754-6782
Benardot, D
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Article ID 1033
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) glycogen restoration
high carbohydrate
high fat diet
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
periodized nutrition
Science & Technology
Summary Periodized carbohydrate availability can enhance exercise capacity, but the effects of short-term fat adaptation carbohydrate restoration (FACR) diets on metabolic responses and exercise performance in endurance athletes have not been conclusively determined. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a FACR diet on measures of resting metabolism, exercise metabolism, and exercise performance. Well-trained male runners (n = 8) completed a FACR dietary intervention (five days’ carbohydrate < 20% and fat > 60% energy, plus one-day carbohydrate ≥ 70% energy), and a control high-carbohydrate (HCHO) diet for six days (carbohydrate > 60% energy; fat < 20% energy) in a randomized crossover design. Pre- and post-intervention metabolic measures included resting metabolic rate (RMR), respiratory quotient (RQ), maximum fat oxidation rate during exercise (MFO), and maximum fat oxidation intensity (FATmax). Measures of exercise performance included maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), running economy (RE), and 5 km running time trial (5 km-TT). In FACR compared with HCHO, there were significant improvements in FATmax (p = 0.006) and RE (p = 0.048). There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between FACR and HCHO in RMR, RQ, VO2max, or 5 km-TT. Findings suggest that a short-term (six days) FACR diet may facilitate increased fat oxidation and submaximal exercise economy but does not improve 5 km-TT performance.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13031033
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149807

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.