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Processed foods drive intestinal barrier permeability and microvascular diseases

Snelson, Matthew, Tan, Sih Min, Clarke, Rachel E, De Pasquale, Cassandra, Thallas-Bonke, Vicki, Nguyen, Tuong-Vi, Penfold, Sally A, Harcourt, Brooke E, Sourris, Karly C, Lindblom, Runa S, Ziemann, Mark, Steer, David, El-Osta, Assam, Davies, Michael J, Donnellan, Leigh, Deo, Permal, Kellow, Nicole J, Cooper, Mark E, Woodruff, Trent M, Mackay, Charles R, Forbes, Josephine M and Coughlan, Melinda T 2021, Processed foods drive intestinal barrier permeability and microvascular diseases, Science advances, vol. 7, no. 14, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.abe4841.

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Title Processed foods drive intestinal barrier permeability and microvascular diseases
Author(s) Snelson, Matthew
Tan, Sih Min
Clarke, Rachel E
De Pasquale, Cassandra
Thallas-Bonke, Vicki
Nguyen, Tuong-Vi
Penfold, Sally A
Harcourt, Brooke E
Sourris, Karly C
Lindblom, Runa S
Ziemann, MarkORCID iD for Ziemann, Mark orcid.org/0000-0002-7688-6974
Steer, David
El-Osta, Assam
Davies, Michael J
Donnellan, Leigh
Deo, Permal
Kellow, Nicole J
Cooper, Mark E
Woodruff, Trent M
Mackay, Charles R
Forbes, Josephine M
Coughlan, Melinda T
Journal name Science advances
Volume number 7
Issue number 14
Article ID eabe4841
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2021-03
ISSN 2375-2548
2375-2548
Summary Intake of processed foods has increased markedly over the past decades, coinciding with increased microvascular diseases such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. Here, we show in rodent models that long-term consumption of a processed diet drives intestinal barrier permeability and an increased risk of CKD. Inhibition of the advanced glycation pathway, which generates Maillard reaction products within foods upon thermal processing, reversed kidney injury. Consequently, a processed diet leads to innate immune complement activation and local kidney inflammation and injury via the potent proinflammatory effector molecule complement 5a (C5a). In a mouse model of diabetes, a high resistant starch fiber diet maintained gut barrier integrity and decreased severity of kidney injury via suppression of complement. These results demonstrate mechanisms by which processed foods cause inflammation that leads to chronic disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.abe4841
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149855

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Created: Wed, 14 Apr 2021, 15:07:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.