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The binary fraction of planetary nebula central stars - II. A larger sample and improved technique for the infrared excess search

Douchin, D, De Marco, O, Frew, D J, Jacoby, G H, Jasniewicz, G, Fitzgerald, Michael, Passy, J C, Harmer, D, Hillwig, T and Moe, M 2015, The binary fraction of planetary nebula central stars - II. A larger sample and improved technique for the infrared excess search, Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, vol. 448, no. 4, pp. 3132-3155, doi: 10.1093/mnras/stu2700.

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Title The binary fraction of planetary nebula central stars - II. A larger sample and improved technique for the infrared excess search
Author(s) Douchin, D
De Marco, O
Frew, D J
Jacoby, G H
Jasniewicz, G
Fitzgerald, MichaelORCID iD for Fitzgerald, Michael orcid.org/0000-0001-6554-1826
Passy, J C
Harmer, D
Hillwig, T
Moe, M
Journal name Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume number 448
Issue number 4
Start page 3132
End page 3155
Total pages 24
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 0035-8711
1365-2966
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Astronomy & Astrophysics
techniques: photometric
surveys
binaries: general
stars: evolution
stars: statistics
planetary nebulae: general
H-ALPHA SURVEY
BE-URSAE-MAJORIS
SKY SURVEY
TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES
POPULATION SYNTHESIS
RADIAL-VELOCITY
GALACTIC PLANE
STELLAR LOCUS
WHITE-DWARFS
NUCLEI
Summary There is no conclusive explanation of why ∼80 per cent of planetary nebulae (PNe) are non-spherical. In the Binary Hypothesis, a binary interaction is a preferred channel to form a non-spherical PN. A fundamental step to corroborate or disprove the Binary Hypothesis is to estimate the binary fraction of central stars of PNe (CSPNe) and compare it with a prediction based on the binary fraction of the progenitor, main-sequence population. In this paper, the second in a series, we search for spatially unresolved I- and J-band flux excess in an extended sample of 34 CSPN by a refined measurement technique with a better quantification of the uncertainties. The detection rate of I- (J-)band flux excess is 32 ± 16 per cent (50 ± 24 per cent). This result is very close to what was obtained in Paper I with a smaller sample. We account conservatively for unobserved cool companions down to brown dwarf luminosities, increasing these fractions to 40 ± 20 per cent (62 ± 30 per cent). This step is very sensitive to the adopted brightness limit of our survey. Accounting for visual companions increases the binary fraction to 46 ± 23 per cent (71 ± 34 per cent). These figures are lower than in Paper I. The error bars are better quantified, but still unacceptably large. Taken at face value, the current CSPN binary fraction is in line with the main-sequence progenitor population binary fraction. However, including white dwarfs companions could increase this fraction by as much as 13 (21) per cent points.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/mnras/stu2700
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149879

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.