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The dietary inflammatory index is associated with low muscle mass and low muscle function in older Australians

Gojanovic, Marlene, Holloway-Kew, Kara L, Hyde, Natalie K, Mohebbi, Mohammadreza, Shivappa, Nitin, Hebert, James R, O'Neil, Adrienne and Pasco, Julie A 2021, The dietary inflammatory index is associated with low muscle mass and low muscle function in older Australians, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/nu13041166.

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Title The dietary inflammatory index is associated with low muscle mass and low muscle function in older Australians
Author(s) Gojanovic, Marlene
Holloway-Kew, Kara L
Hyde, Natalie KORCID iD for Hyde, Natalie K orcid.org/0000-0002-0693-2904
Mohebbi, MohammadrezaORCID iD for Mohebbi, Mohammadreza orcid.org/0000-0001-9713-7211
Shivappa, Nitin
Hebert, James R
O'Neil, Adrienne
Pasco, Julie AORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Article ID 1166
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-04
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) aged
dietary inflammatory index
dietary patterns
frailty
inflammation
muscle function
muscle mass
sarcopenia
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Science & Technology
Summary Age-associated chronic, low grade systemic inflammation has been recognised as an important contributing factor in the development of sarcopenia; importantly, diet may regulate this process. This cross-sectional study examined the association of diet-related inflammation with components of sarcopenia. Participants (n = 809) aged 60–95 years from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study were studied. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. In this study, low appendicular lean mass (ALM/height2, kg/m2) was defined as T-score < −1 and low muscle function as Timed-Up-and-Go > 10 s over 3 m (TUG > 10). Dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores, based on specific foods and nutrients, were computed using dietary data collected from a food frequency questionnaire. Associations between DII scores and low muscle mass and low muscle function, alone and combined, were determined using linear and logistic regression. After adjusting for covariates, higher DII score was associated with lower ALM/height2 (β −0.05, standard error (SE) 0.02, p = 0.028), and higher natural log-transformed (ln) (TUG) (β 0.02, standard error 0.01, p = 0.035) and higher likelihood for these components combined (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.69, p = 0.015). A pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by higher DII score, is associated with lower muscle mass, poorer muscle function and increased likelihood for the combination of low muscle mass and low muscle function. Further studies investigating whether anti-inflammatory dietary interventions could reduce the risk of sarcopenia are needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13041166
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149907

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.