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Longitudinal trajectories of diet quality and subsequent mortality among Chinese adults: results from the China health and nutrition survey 1997–2015

Liu, Ming-Wei, McNaughton, Sarah A, He, Qi-Qiang and Leech, Rebecca 2021, Longitudinal trajectories of diet quality and subsequent mortality among Chinese adults: results from the China health and nutrition survey 1997–2015, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12966-021-01118-7.

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Title Longitudinal trajectories of diet quality and subsequent mortality among Chinese adults: results from the China health and nutrition survey 1997–2015
Author(s) Liu, Ming-Wei
McNaughton, Sarah AORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
He, Qi-Qiang
Leech, RebeccaORCID iD for Leech, Rebecca orcid.org/0000-0002-5333-0164
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 51
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Diet quality
Mortality
Cohort
Trajectory
China
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Science & Technology
Summary Background China has witnessed a significant nutritional transition. However, there is a gap in the literature investigating the association between change of diet and mortality among Chinese. Thus, we aimed to explore the longitudinal trajectories of diet quality over 10 years (from 1997 to 2006) and the subsequent risk of death till 2015 among Chinese adults. Methods Data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey were analyzed in 6398 adults. Dietary intake was assessed using three consecutive 24-h recalls. Diet quality was assessed by the Chinese Healthy Eating Index (CHEI), which includes 17 components and is based on the Dietary Guidelines for Chinese. Latent Class Growth Analysis was conducted to derive trajectories of diet quality over 10 years. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for total mortality. Results Four distinct CHEI trajectories were identified: 1) worsening; 2) low-moderate-low; 3) improving; 4) high-moderate-high. Group 3 had the lowest mortality rate (5.6%) in the subsequent 9 years, while the groups with worsening or low diet quality had a higher mortality rate (Group 1: 7.5%; Group 2: 10.8%). In the fully adjusted model, compared to group 2, mortality rates were lower for group 3 (RR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.97) and group 4 (RR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.98). No associations with mortality were found for the group 1, when compared to group 2. Conclusions Long-term improved diet quality and adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Chinese may decrease the risk of death in Chinese adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01118-7
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1175250
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149929

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.