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Movement intensity demands between training activities and competition for elite female netballers

Brooks, Edward R, Benson, Amanda C, Fox, Aaron S and Bruce, Lyndell M 2021, Movement intensity demands between training activities and competition for elite female netballers, PLoS ONE, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0249679.

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Title Movement intensity demands between training activities and competition for elite female netballers
Author(s) Brooks, Edward RORCID iD for Brooks, Edward R orcid.org/0000-0003-2649-9535
Benson, Amanda C
Fox, Aaron SORCID iD for Fox, Aaron S orcid.org/0000-0002-5639-6388
Bruce, Lyndell MORCID iD for Bruce, Lyndell M orcid.org/0000-0003-4652-5171
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 16
Issue number 4
Article ID e0249679
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2021-04-07
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology
sports
accelerometers
inertia
drug interactions
drug regulation
magnetometers
research design
statistical models
Summary The aim of this study was to assess the differences in movement intensity demands between training activities and competition match-play in elite netball. Twelve elite female netballers (mean ± SD, age = 25.9 ± 5.1 years; height = 178.6 ± 8.9 cm, body mass = 71.1 ± 7.1 kg) competing in Australia’s premier domestic netball competition participated. Data were collected across the season from all pre-season training sessions (n = 29), pre-season practice matches (n = 8), in-season training sessions (n = 21), in-season practice matches (n = 5), and competition matches (n = 15). Linear mixed-effects models assessed differences in PlayerLoad™ per minute and metreage per minute between activity types (Specialist, Skill Drills, Set-piece, Match Scenarios, Practice Match-play, and Competition Match-play) for positional groupings (Defenders, Midcourters, and Goalers). Competition Match-play resulted in higher (p < 0.05) PlayerLoad™ than all training activity types, with the largest magnitudes of difference between Specialist–Competition (d = 0.44–0.59; small to medium) and Skill Drills–Competition (d = 0.35–0.63; small to medium) for all positional groups. The smallest difference was found between Match Scenarios–Competition (d = 0.12–0.20; trivial to small) and Practice Match-play–Competition (d = 0.12–0.14; trivial). Competition Match-play also resulted in higher (p < 0.05) metreage per minute than Specialist (d = 0.23–0.53; small to medium), Skill Drills (d = 0.19–0.61; trivial to medium) and Set-piece (d = 0.05–0.31; trivial to small). Training activity demands in order of least to most similar to competition were specialist, skill drills, set-piece, match scenarios, and practice match-play. We provide data that enables coaches and physical preparation staff to incorporate progressions into their training session designs that can replicate the movement intensity demands of competition in training.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0249679
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149965

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.