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Lower health literacy of mania than depression among older people: a random survey of a community healthcare service center

Huang, Leping, Huang, Ruyan, Fei, Yue, Liu, Taosheng, Mellor, David, Xu, Weiyun, Xiong, Jinxia, Mao, Rongjie, Chen, Jun, Fang, Yiru, Wu, Zhiguo and Wang, Zuowei 2021, Lower health literacy of mania than depression among older people: a random survey of a community healthcare service center, Frontiers in psychiatry, vol. 12, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.512689.

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Title Lower health literacy of mania than depression among older people: a random survey of a community healthcare service center
Author(s) Huang, Leping
Huang, Ruyan
Fei, Yue
Liu, Taosheng
Mellor, DavidORCID iD for Mellor, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5007-5906
Xu, Weiyun
Xiong, Jinxia
Mao, Rongjie
Chen, Jun
Fang, Yiru
Wu, Zhiguo
Wang, Zuowei
Journal name Frontiers in psychiatry
Volume number 12
Article ID 512689
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03
ISSN 1664-0640
1664-0640
Keyword(s) health literacy
depression
mania
older people
community healthcare service
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Science & Technology
Summary Purpose: This study examines health literacy among older outpatients in two Community Healthcare Service Centers in Shanghai, China to facilitate the design of public education programs for the aged population on mood disorders (both depression and mania). Patients and Methods: A total of 173 outpatients aged 60 years or more with a chronic physical illness were randomly sampled. A health literacy questionnaire was used to assess participants' awareness of depression and mania. Participants were then asked to label two vignettes depicting depression and mania and to give their recommendations for how to seek help for those in the vignettes and how mood disorders should be managed. Results: In all, 86.1 and 36.4% of participants had heard of depression and mania, respectively, with the most common source of information being relatives and friends. Over half of the participants attributed the possible causes of mood disorders to psychological trauma, pressure or stress in daily life, taking things too hard, and personality problems. Almost two-thirds of participants correctly labeled the depression vignette, but only 26.6% correctly labeled the mania vignette. The most common methods recommended by the participants as being helpful for the individuals portrayed in the vignettes were “traveling” and help-seeking from a psychological therapist/counselor, a psychiatrist, or a close family member or friend. Conclusion: The older individuals attending community healthcare service settings in Shanghai have good depression literacy but relatively poor mania literacy. However, most participants had a positive attitude toward psychiatric treatment for mood disorders.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.512689
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149981

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.