Postexercise hot-water immersion does not further enhance heat adaptation or performance in endurance athletes training in a hot environment

Stevens, Christopher J, Ross, Megan LR, Carr, Amelia J, Vallance, Brent, Best, Russ, Urwin, Charles, Périard, Julien D and Burke, Louise 2021, Postexercise hot-water immersion does not further enhance heat adaptation or performance in endurance athletes training in a hot environment, International journal of sports physiology and performance, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 480-488, doi: 10.1123/IJSPP.2020-0114.

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Title Postexercise hot-water immersion does not further enhance heat adaptation or performance in endurance athletes training in a hot environment
Author(s) Stevens, Christopher J
Ross, Megan LR
Carr, Amelia JORCID iD for Carr, Amelia J orcid.org/0000-0003-3855-2540
Vallance, Brent
Best, Russ
Urwin, CharlesORCID iD for Urwin, Charles orcid.org/0000-0002-9467-0077
Périard, Julien D
Burke, Louise
Journal name International journal of sports physiology and performance
Volume number 16
Issue number 4
Start page 480
End page 488
Total pages 9
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2021-04
ISSN 1555-0265
1555-0273
Keyword(s) thermoregulation
heat stress
racewalking
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
Science & Technology
Sport Sciences
Summary Purpose Hot-water immersion (HWI) after training in temperate conditions has been shown to induce thermophysiological adaptations and improve endurance performance in the heat; however, the potential additive effects of HWI and training in hot outdoor conditions remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of repeated postexercise HWI in athletes training in a hot environment. Methods A total of 13 (9 female) elite/preelite racewalkers completed a 15-day training program in outdoor heat (mean afternoon high temperature = 34.6°C). Athletes were divided into 2 matched groups that completed either HWI (40°C for 30–40 min) or seated rest in 21°C (CON), following 8 training sessions. Pre–post testing included a 30-minute fixed-intensity walk in heat, laboratory incremental walk to exhaustion, and 10,000-m outdoor time trial. Results Training frequency and volume were similar between groups (P = .54). Core temperature was significantly higher during immersion in HWI (38.5 [0.3]) than CON (37.8°C [0.2°C]; P < .001). There were no differences between groups in resting or exercise rectal temperature or heart rate, skin temperature, sweat rate, or the speed at lactate threshold 2, maximal O2 uptake, or 10,000-m performance (P > .05). There were significant (P < .05) pre–post differences for both groups in submaximal exercising heart rate (∼11 beats·min−1), sweat rate (0.34–0.55 L·h−1) and thermal comfort (1.2–1.5 arbitrary units), and 10,000-m racewalking performance time (∼3 min). Conclusions Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in markers of heat adaptation and performance; however, the addition of HWI did not provide further enhancements. Improvements in adaptation appeared to be maximized by the training program in hot conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1123/IJSPP.2020-0114
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
1116 Medical Physiology
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150023

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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