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Use of live chat in higher education to support self-regulated help seeking behaviours: a comparison of online and blended learner perspectives

Broadbent, Jaclyn and Lodge, Jason 2021, Use of live chat in higher education to support self-regulated help seeking behaviours: a comparison of online and blended learner perspectives, International journal of educational technology in higher education, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.1186/s41239-021-00253-2.

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Title Use of live chat in higher education to support self-regulated help seeking behaviours: a comparison of online and blended learner perspectives
Author(s) Broadbent, JaclynORCID iD for Broadbent, Jaclyn orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Lodge, Jason
Journal name International journal of educational technology in higher education
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 17
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Cham, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2365-9440
2365-9440
Keyword(s) Blended learning
Education & Educational Research
Help-seeking
Higher education
Instant messaging
Live chat
Online learning
Self-regulated learning
Social Sciences
Summary Abstract Help-seeking is an essential self-regulatory and metacognitive skill. In the online learning environment, much of the learning is self-directed and there are generally less opportunities to receive help in real time. The uses of email and discussion boards are the most common method of seeking help in these environments. The current study explored students’ perceptions of the use of live chat technology for online academic help-seeking within higher education, with a focus on comparing online and blended learners’ perspectives. Participants were 246 students who were studying psychology online (n = 91) or in blended learning (n = 155) environments. The live chat technology was well received by both groups, especially for its ability to provide instant, real-time, and convenient help. Live chat was particularly well received by online learners, who were more satisfied, felt more cared about by the teaching team, and would be more likely to recommend it to others than blended learners. Further, online learners reported that live chat gave them better access to staff, and felt that this feature was a good approximation for more traditional face-to-face conversations. As an online, synchronous, private help-seeking tool between student and teacher, these findings provide a strong endorsement for the use of live chat in higher education, particularly for online learners.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s41239-021-00253-2
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150064

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.