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Translating co-design from face-to-face to online: an australian primary producer project conducted during covid-19

Kennedy, Alison, Cosgrave, Catherine, Macdonald, Joanna, Gunn, Kate, Dietrich, Timo and Brumby, Susan 2021, Translating co-design from face-to-face to online: an australian primary producer project conducted during covid-19, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18084147.

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Title Translating co-design from face-to-face to online: an australian primary producer project conducted during covid-19
Author(s) Kennedy, AlisonORCID iD for Kennedy, Alison orcid.org/0000-0002-4450-8434
Cosgrave, Catherine
Macdonald, Joanna
Gunn, Kate
Dietrich, Timo
Brumby, SusanORCID iD for Brumby, Susan orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-3374
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 8
Article ID 4147
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) COVID-19
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
farmer
fisher
HEALTH
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
mental health
online co-design
primary producer
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
risk prevention
Science & Technology
Summary Primary producers face considerable risks for poor mental health. While this population can be difficult to engage in programs to prevent poor mental health, approaches tailored to reflect the context of primary producers’ life and work have been successful. This paper reports on the co-design phase of a project designed to prevent poor mental health for primary producers—specifically, the advantages, challenges and considerations of translating face-to-face co-design methods to an online environment in response to COVID-19 restrictions. The co-design phase drew upon the existing seven-step co-design framework developed by Trischler and colleagues. Online methods were adopted for all steps of the process. This paper models how this co-design approach can work in an online, primary producer context and details key considerations for future initiatives of this type. The development of online co-design methods is an important additional research method for use not only during a pandemic but also when operating with limited resources or geographic constraints. Results demonstrate the following: (i) co-designing online is possible given adequate preparation, training and resource allocation; (ii) “hard to reach” populations can be engaged using online methods providing there is adequate early-stage relationship building; (iii) co-design quality need not be compromised and may be improved when translating to online; and (iv) saved costs and resources associated with online methods can be realigned towards intervention/service creation, promotion and user engagement. Suggestions for extending Trischler and colleagues’ model are incorporated.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18084147
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150114

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.