Openly accessible

How malaria parasites acquire nutrients from their host

Counihan, Natalie A, Modak, Joyanta K and de Koning-Ward, Tania F 2021, How malaria parasites acquire nutrients from their host, Frontiers in cell and developmental biology, vol. 9, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fcell.2021.649184.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title How malaria parasites acquire nutrients from their host
Author(s) Counihan, Natalie A
Modak, Joyanta K
de Koning-Ward, Tania FORCID iD for de Koning-Ward, Tania F orcid.org/0000-0001-5810-8063
Journal name Frontiers in cell and developmental biology
Volume number 9
Article ID 649184
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03-25
ISSN 2296-634X
2296-634X
Keyword(s) Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
malaria
new permeation pathway
nutrients
Plasmodium
Science & Technology
transporters
Summary Plasmodium parasites responsible for the disease malaria reside within erythrocytes. Inside this niche host cell, parasites internalize and digest host hemoglobin to source amino acids required for protein production. However, hemoglobin does not contain isoleucine, an amino acid essential for Plasmodium growth, and the parasite cannot synthesize it de novo. The parasite is also more metabolically active than its host cell, and the rate at which some nutrients are consumed exceeds the rate at which they can be taken up by erythrocyte transporters. To overcome these constraints, Plasmodium parasites increase the permeability of the erythrocyte membrane to isoleucine and other low-molecular-weight solutes it requires for growth by forming new permeation pathways (NPPs). In addition to the erythrocyte membrane, host nutrients also need to cross the encasing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) and the parasite plasma membrane to access the parasite. This review outlines recent advances that have been made in identifying the molecular constituents of the NPPs, the PVM nutrient channel, and the endocytic apparatus that transports host hemoglobin and identifies key knowledge gaps that remain. Importantly, blocking the ability of Plasmodium to source essential nutrients is lethal to the parasite, and thus, components of these key pathways represent potential antimalaria drug targets.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fcell.2021.649184
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150119

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 27 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 19 Apr 2021, 08:08:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.