Openly accessible

Hypothalamic effects of neonatal diet: reversible and only partially leptin dependent

Sominsky, Luba, Ziko, I, Nguyen, T X, Quach, J and Spencer, SJ 2017, Hypothalamic effects of neonatal diet: reversible and only partially leptin dependent, The journal of endocrinology, vol. 234, no. 1, pp. 41-56, doi: 10.1530/JOE-16-0631.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Hypothalamic effects of neonatal diet: reversible and only partially leptin dependent
Author(s) Sominsky, Luba
Ziko, I
Nguyen, T X
Quach, J
Spencer, SJ
Journal name The journal of endocrinology
Volume number 234
Issue number 1
Start page 41
End page 56
Total pages 16
Publisher BioScientifica Ltd.
Place of publication Bristol, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 0022-0795
1479-6805
Keyword(s) agouti-related peptide
AGOUTI-RELATED PROTEIN
ARCUATE NUCLEUS
BODY-WEIGHT
developmental programming
Endocrinology & Metabolism
FEEDING-BEHAVIOR
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MATERNAL OBESITY
neuropeptide Y
NEUROPEPTIDE-Y
obesity
PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS
POMC NEURONS
POSTNATAL LEPTIN
pro-opiomelanocortin
PROOPIOMELANOCORTIN NEURONS
Science & Technology
Summary Early life diet influences metabolic programming, increasing the risk for long-lasting metabolic ill health. Neonatally overfed rats have an early increase in leptin that is maintained long term and is associated with a corresponding elevation in body weight. However, the immediate and long-term effects of neonatal overfeeding on hypothalamic anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) circuitry, and if these are directly mediated by leptin, have not yet been examined. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal overfeeding on leptin-mediated development of hypothalamic POMC and AgRP/NPY neurons and whether these effects can be normalised by neonatal leptin antagonism in male Wistar rats. Neonatal overfeeding led to an acute (neonatal) resistance of hypothalamic neurons to exogenous leptin, but this leptin resistance was resolved by adulthood. While there were no effects of neonatal overfeeding on POMC immunoreactivity in neonates or adults, the neonatal overfeeding-induced early increase in arcuate nucleus (ARC) AgRP/NPY fibres was reversed by adulthood so that neonatally overfed adults had reduced NPY immunoreactivity in the ARC compared with controls, with no further differences in AgRP immunoreactivity. Short-term neonatal leptin antagonism did not reverse the excess body weight or hyperleptinaemia in the neonatally overfed, suggesting factors other than leptin may also contribute to the phenotype. Our findings show that changes in the availability of leptin during early life period influence the development of hypothalamic connectivity short term, but this is partly resolved by adulthood indicating an adaptation to the metabolic mal-programming effects of neonatal overfeeding.
Language eng
DOI 10.1530/JOE-16-0631
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0702 Animal Production
0707 Veterinary Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150219

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 9 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 21 Apr 2021, 08:44:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.