Openly accessible

The dffects of a high-protein dairy milk beverage with or without progressive resistance training on fat-free mass, skeletal muscle strength and power, and functional performance in healthy active older adults: a 12-week randomized controlled trial

Huschtscha, Z, Parr, A, Porter, Judi and Costa, R J S 2021, The dffects of a high-protein dairy milk beverage with or without progressive resistance training on fat-free mass, skeletal muscle strength and power, and functional performance in healthy active older adults: a 12-week randomized controlled trial, Frontiers in nutrition, vol. 8, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.3389/fnut.2021.644865.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The dffects of a high-protein dairy milk beverage with or without progressive resistance training on fat-free mass, skeletal muscle strength and power, and functional performance in healthy active older adults: a 12-week randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Huschtscha, Z
Parr, A
Porter, JudiORCID iD for Porter, Judi orcid.org/0000-0002-7535-1919
Costa, R J S
Journal name Frontiers in nutrition
Volume number 8
Article ID 644865
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03-17
ISSN 2296-861X
2296-861X
Keyword(s) calcium
cortisol
estradiol
inflammatory cytokines
insulin
insulin-like growth factor
leucine
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Science & Technology
testosterone
Summary The study aimed to investigate the independent and combined effects of consuming a high-protein dairy milk beverage, twice daily, with or without a progressive resistance training (PRT) program on outcomes of age-related sarcopenia, in healthy active older (≥50 years) adults. In this 12-week, 2 × 2 factorial study, participants were randomly allocated into one of four groups: dairy milk beverage (DM), exercise and dairy milk beverage (EX+DM), exercise alone (EX), and control (CON). The EX group underwent a 12-week whole-body PRT schedule (three sessions/week) and a high-protein dairy milk beverage (DM) was consumed twice daily (30 g protein/day). At weeks 0, 6, and 12, body composition (iDXA), strength [one-repetition maximum (1RM): leg press, chest press, lateral (lat) pull-down, and handgrip], power (countermovement jump), cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2), and physical performance (gait speed) were measured. Before measurements, blood samples were collected to determine the immune (i.e., leukocyte trafficking and inflammatory cytokines) and hormonal (i.e., insulin, cortisol, IGF-1, testosterone, and estradiol) profiles. Participants (n = 37) completed the study within the controlled experimental conditions. Protein intake increased in the EX+DM [mean ± SD, 1.2 ± 0.2 to 1.8 ± 0.4 g/kg body mass (BM) per day−1] and DM (1.3 ± 0.5 to 1.8 ± 0.6 g kg−1 BM day−1) groups during the intervention. Absolute fat-free mass increased in the EX+DM [mean (95% confidence interval) = 0.65 (0.25–1.0) kg] and EX [0.49 (−0.44 to 1.40) kg] groups (P < 0.001) compared to DM [−0.54 (−1.6 to 0.05) kg]. Relative fat mass decreased (group*time, P = 0.018) in DM [−1.8% (−3.3 to −0.35%)] and EX+DM [−1.3% (−2.3 to −0.31%)], which was a greater reduction than that in the CON [0.10% (−0.80 to 1.0%)] group (P < 0.01). Relative maximal strength increased in both the EX and EX+DM (≥35%, P < 0.05) groups, but not in the DM and CON groups. The change in 1RM strength outcomes was higher in EX+DM compared to all other groups (53–78%, P < 0.01). There was an increase in resting plasma IL-10 concentration in EX+DM (88%), compared to all the other groups (P = 0.016). No other differences in systemic inflammatory cytokines were observed. There were no significant changes in all hormone concentrations measured among all groups. In conclusion, a high-protein dairy milk beverage providing additional protein did not further enhance the effects of PRT on outcomes of fat-free mass, power, or physical performance. However, there was a significant augmentative effect for high-protein dairy milk consumption on changes to maximal strength outcomes during PRT in healthy active older adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnut.2021.644865
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1001 Agricultural Biotechnology
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150234

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 7 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 21 Apr 2021, 09:23:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.