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Recent advances in perylene diimide-based active materials in electrical mode gas sensing

Ali, S, Gupta, Akhil, Shafiei, M and Langford, SJ 2021, Recent advances in perylene diimide-based active materials in electrical mode gas sensing, Chemosensors, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1-32, doi: 10.3390/chemosensors9020030.

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Title Recent advances in perylene diimide-based active materials in electrical mode gas sensing
Author(s) Ali, S
Gupta, AkhilORCID iD for Gupta, Akhil orcid.org/0000-0002-1257-8104
Shafiei, M
Langford, SJ
Journal name Chemosensors
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Article ID 30
Start page 1
End page 32
Total pages 32
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2227-9040
Keyword(s) n-type organic molecules
perylene diimide
hydrazine
ammonia
sensors
Summary This review provides an update on advances in the area of electrical mode sensors using organic small molecule n-type semiconductors based on perylene. Among small organic molecules, perylene diimides (PDIs) are an important class of materials due to their outstanding thermal, chemical, electronic, and optical properties, all of which make them promising candidates for a wide range of organic electronic devices including sensors, organic solar cells, organic field-effect transistors, and organic light-emitting diodes. This is mainly due to their electron-withdrawing nature and significant charge transfer properties. Perylene-based sensors of this type show high sensing performance towards various analytes, particularly reducing gases like ammonia and hydrazine, but there are several issues that need to be addressed including the selectivity towards a specific gas, the effect of relative humidity, and operating temperature. In this review, we focus on the strategies and design principles applied to the gas-sensing performance of PDI-based devices, including resistive sensors, amperometric sensors, and operating at room temperature. The device properties and sensing mechanisms for different analytes, focusing on hydrazine and ammonia, are studied in detail, and some future research perspectives are discussed for this promising field. We hope the discussed results and examples inspire new forms of molecular engineering and begin to open opportunities for other rylene diimide classes to be applied as active materials.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/chemosensors9020030
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID Australian Research Council’s Discovery Grant Scheme through DP170104477 and DP170102145
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology
PhD scholarship under the Swinburne Postgraduate Research Award (SUPRA) program
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150264

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.