Associations between dairy consumption and constipation in adults: A cross-sectional study

Aslam, H, Mohebbi, Mohammadreza, Ruusunen, Anu, Dawson, Samantha, Williams, Lana, Berk, Michael, Holloway-Kew, KL, Collier, F, Loughman, Amy, Pasco, Julie and Jacka, Felice 2021, Associations between dairy consumption and constipation in adults: A cross-sectional study, Nutrition and Health, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1177/02601060211004784.

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Title Associations between dairy consumption and constipation in adults: A cross-sectional study
Author(s) Aslam, H
Mohebbi, MohammadrezaORCID iD for Mohebbi, Mohammadreza orcid.org/0000-0001-9713-7211
Ruusunen, AnuORCID iD for Ruusunen, Anu orcid.org/0000-0002-1169-7478
Dawson, SamanthaORCID iD for Dawson, Samantha orcid.org/0000-0002-4701-1220
Williams, LanaORCID iD for Williams, Lana orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Holloway-Kew, KL
Collier, F
Loughman, AmyORCID iD for Loughman, Amy orcid.org/0000-0002-0257-1443
Pasco, JulieORCID iD for Pasco, Julie orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Jacka, FeliceORCID iD for Jacka, Felice orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Journal name Nutrition and Health
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04-08
ISSN 0260-1060
2047-945X
Keyword(s) bowel symptoms
Constipation
dairy
milk
milk proteins
Summary Objective: The current study aimed to assess the association between dairy consumption and constipation in the general adult population. Design: Data from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study were used to assess the association between dairy consumption and constipation in women ( n=632) and men ( n=609). Information on milk, yogurt and cheese, and constipation were self-reported. Total dairy was calculated by summing the intake of milk, yogurt and cheese and expressed as servings per day. Multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for irritable bowel syndrome, major depressive disorders, mobility, body mass index, age and fibre intake were used to examine the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) between the consumption of categories of total dairy, milk, yogurt, cheese, and constipation. Results: In women, consumption of 1–2 servings/d of total dairy was associated with reduced odds for constipation (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.26-0.90; P=0.021) compared to consuming <1 serving/d of total dairy after adjusting for covariates. Also, consumption of 1–4 servings/d of milk was associated with marginally reduced odds for constipation (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.39-1.02; P=0.058) compared to women who consumed <1 serving/d of milk after adjusting for covariates. There were no significant associations detected between other types of dairy consumption and constipation in women, and none in men. Conclusion: In women, consumption of moderate amounts of dairy is associated with reduced odds for constipation whereas in men no associations were detected between dairy consumption and constipation. Further studies are warranted to confirm results.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/02601060211004784
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150276

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research
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