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One hundred research questions in conservation physiology for generating actionable evidence to inform conservation policy and practice

Cooke, SJ, Bergman, JN, Madliger, CL, Cramp, RL, Beardall, J, Burness, G, Clark, Timothy, Dantzer, B, de la Barrera, E, Fangue, NA, Franklin, CE, Fuller, A, Hawkes, LA, Hultine, KR, Hunt, KE, Love, OP, MacMillan, HA, Mandelman, JW, Mark, FC, Martin, LB, Newman, AEM, Nicotra, AB, Raby, GD, Robinson, SA, Ropert-Coudert, Y, Rummer, JL, Seebacher, F, Todgham, AE, Tomlinson, S and Chown, SL 2021, One hundred research questions in conservation physiology for generating actionable evidence to inform conservation policy and practice, Conservation Physiology, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1093/conphys/coab009.

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Title One hundred research questions in conservation physiology for generating actionable evidence to inform conservation policy and practice
Author(s) Cooke, SJ
Bergman, JN
Madliger, CL
Cramp, RL
Beardall, J
Burness, G
Clark, TimothyORCID iD for Clark, Timothy orcid.org/0000-0001-8738-3347
Dantzer, B
de la Barrera, E
Fangue, NA
Franklin, CE
Fuller, A
Hawkes, LA
Hultine, KR
Hunt, KE
Love, OP
MacMillan, HA
Mandelman, JW
Mark, FC
Martin, LB
Newman, AEM
Nicotra, AB
Raby, GD
Robinson, SA
Ropert-Coudert, Y
Rummer, JL
Seebacher, F
Todgham, AE
Tomlinson, S
Chown, SL
Journal name Conservation Physiology
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Article ID coab009
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2051-1434
2051-1434
Keyword(s) Biodiversity threats
conservation decisions
conservation physiology
evidence
research questions
Summary Abstract Environmental change and biodiversity loss are but two of the complex challenges facing conservation practitioners and policy makers. Relevant and robust scientific knowledge is critical for providing decision-makers with the actionable evidence needed to inform conservation decisions. In the Anthropocene, science that leads to meaningful improvements in biodiversity conservation, restoration and management is desperately needed. Conservation Physiology has emerged as a discipline that is well-positioned to identify the mechanisms underpinning population declines, predict responses to environmental change and test different in situ and ex situ conservation interventions for diverse taxa and ecosystems. Here we present a consensus list of 10 priority research themes. Within each theme we identify specific research questions (100 in total), answers to which will address conservation problems and should improve the management of biological resources. The themes frame a set of research questions related to the following: (i) adaptation and phenotypic plasticity; (ii) human–induced environmental change; (iii) human–wildlife interactions; (iv) invasive species; (v) methods, biomarkers and monitoring; (vi) policy, engagement and communication; (vii) pollution; (viii) restoration actions; (ix) threatened species; and (x) urban systems. The themes and questions will hopefully guide and inspire researchers while also helping to demonstrate to practitioners and policy makers the many ways in which physiology can help to support their decisions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/conphys/coab009
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 05 Environmental Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150344

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.