Poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with increased risk of Metabolic Syndrome in children. The Healthy Growth Study

George, Elena S, Gavrili, Stavroula, Itsiopoulos, Catherine, Manios, Yannis and Moschonis, George 2021, Poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with increased risk of Metabolic Syndrome in children. The Healthy Growth Study, Public health nutrition, vol. 24, no. 10, pp. 2823-2833, doi: 10.1017/s1368980021001701.

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Title Poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with increased risk of Metabolic Syndrome in children. The Healthy Growth Study
Author(s) George, Elena SORCID iD for George, Elena S orcid.org/0000-0002-1385-2371
Gavrili, Stavroula
Itsiopoulos, Catherine
Manios, Yannis
Moschonis, George
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 24
Issue number 10
Start page 2823
End page 2833
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) children
insulin resistance
Mediterranean diet
metabolic syndrome
obesity
Summary Objective:
To examine the associations between the level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with obesity, insulin resistance (IR), metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in schoolchildren.Design:The Healthy Growth Study was a large epidemiological cross-sectional study.
Setting:
School children who were enrolled in primary schools in four counties covering the northern, southern, western and central part of Greece were invited to participate.
Participants:
The study was conducted with a representative sample of 9–13-year-old schoolchildren (n 1972) with complete data. This study applied the KIDMed score to determine ‘poor’ (≤3), ‘medium’ (4-7) and ‘high’ (≥8) adherence of children to the MedDiet. The research hypothesis was examined using multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for potential confounders.
Results:
The percentage of children with ‘poor’, ‘medium’ and ‘high’ adherence to the MedDiet was 64·8 %, 34·2 % and 1 %, respectively. Furthermore, the prevalence of obesity, IR and MetS was 11·6 %, 28·8 % and 3·4 %, respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that ‘poor’ adherence to the MedDiet was associated with an increased likelihood for central obesity (OR 1·31; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·73), hypertriglyceridaemia (OR 2·80; 95 % CI 1·05, 7·46) and IR (OR 1·31; 95 % CI 1·05, 1·64), even after adjusting for several potential confounders.
Conclusions:
The present study showed that approximately two-thirds of the examined sample of schoolchildren in Greece have ‘poor’ adherence to the MedDiet, which also increases the likelihood for central obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia and IR. Prospective studies are needed to confirm whether these are cause–effect associations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/s1368980021001701
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150371

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